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09 November 2017

Ghosts of Christmas Past (Remake) [2LP white vinyl, TWI 158]

To the outside of everything

2LP: UK 09.11.17 (Les Disques du Crépuscule, TWI 158)

Tracklisting

One Christmas for Your Thoughts - The Durutti Column

Notes

Les Disques du Crépuscule presents a special 2LP white vinyl edition of classic festive album Ghosts of Christmas Past, featuring favourites from the original 1981 and 1982 editions plus selected newer tracks by Crépuscule artists.

It's released on 9 November 2017 as TWI 158.

Sometimes witty, sometimes melancholic, the original version of Ghosts of Christmas Past in November 1981 featured exclusive contributions from luminaries such as Tuxedomoon, The Durutti Column, Paul Haig, Michael Nyman, Aztec Camera, Thick Pigeon and The Names. Subsequent editions in 1982 and 1986 added songs by Antena, Mikado, The French Impressionists, Pale Fountains and Winston Tong.

The Durutti Column track on this edition is One Christmas For Your Thoughts. Snowflakes is on the 2CD edition.

Festive cover art is by Jean-Francois Octave and the double vinyl comes in a gatefold sleeve.

Available to buy direct from Les Disques du Crépuscule mail order.

Also available: 2CD version

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05 November 2017

To The Outside of Everything [Cherry Red, 2017]

To the outside of everything

5CD: UK 07.12.17 (Cherry Red compilation)

Tracklisting

Sketch For Summer – The Durutti Column

Notes

To the Outside of Everything is a 5CD box set with extensive liner notes which tells the story of how the UK's post-punk scene evolved from the spirit of 1977 and the arrival of key labels such as Fast, Rough Trade, Zoo, Factory Records and Cherry Red.

To the Outside of Everything is available to pre-order now direct from Cherry Red.




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13 October 2017

A Paean To Wilson [Cargo/Durutti/Kooky 2LP blue vinyl]

The Durutti Column - A Paean to Wilson

2LP: UK 17.11.17 (Cargo/The Durutti Column/Kooky Records, Kookydisc 35)

Tracklisting

One

I Or Are You Just A Technician
II Chant
III Quatro

Two

IV Requiem
V Stuki
VI Along Came Poppy

Three

VII Brother
VIII Duet With Piano
IX Darkness Here

Four

X Catos Revisited
XI The Truth
XII How Unbelievable

Liner notes by Vini Reilly

A Paean to Wilson is part of a body of work which I started around the time that my friend, Tony Wilson died. Towards the end of his illness, I sent him an instrumental track and he loved it, so I decided that the right thing to do was carry on.

I was at the hospital when he died. We were very, very close. Afterwards, many things were done in his name. They were all about 'Mr Manchester', and about what Tony had done for music, art and literature. I didn't attend many of them. I'd just lost one of my closest friends and I had all the grief that you feel under such circumstances. Once I'd got my act together though, I decided to do something for myself and for Tony.

The Durutti Column was Tony Wilson's baby. We were the first act signed up to his Factory club night and the first band signed to Factory Records. Over the years we worked on many albums together and the one thing that Tony and I always argued about was that he thought that I should make music and write rather than sing.

After he died, I decided to make a body of work which did not have traditional song structures and which was concerned solely with the musical content. My only objective was to create some music that Tony would thoroughly approve of. I think I've done that and, if his spirit lives on - which I like to think that it does - I want him to know that this is for him. Vini Reilly

Credits

Musicians
Vini Reilly - Guitar, Piano
Bruce Mitchell - Drums, Marimba
Keir Stewart - Bass, Keyboards, Harmonica
Poppy Morgan - Piano
John Metcalfe - Viola
Tim Kellet - Trumpet

Ruby Morgan, Kate Williamson - Vocals

String arrangements by Ian Livingstone and Keir Stewart; performed by the Livingstone Chamber Ensemble. Recorded at Highfield Studios, Guildford, Surrey

Composed by Reilly, Stewart & Mitchell

Drums engineered by Seadna McPhail and recorded at Moolah Rouge, Manchester

Produced by Keir Stewart
Executive producer Bruce Mitchell

Mixed & mastered by Keir Stewart at Inch Studio, Manchester - www.inchstudio.com

The copyright in this recording is owned by Bruce Mitchell Productions

Photography by Stephen Wright
Sleeve by Trevor Johnson & Lynx Studio

Notes

Double blue vinyl reissue edition produced by Cargo Records in association with The Durutti Column. Packaging, credits and notes are similar to the 2LP edition produced by Kooky Records for Record Store Day 2013 in the UK (which is sold out). Please note this 2017 edition does not include the envelope containing the Manchester International Festival programme and the large postcard featuring the original artwork which were include in RSD 2013 package. Please also note that the 'Heaven Sent' tracks offered via download with the RSD 2013 2LP or as CD2 in the original cd version (Kookydisc 29/2) are not included.

The 2CD version (with 'Heaven Sent' bonus disc) is available again via Cargo.

Finally, please also note that this is not technically a formal Kooky Records release but is rather a Cargo/Durutti co-production. However, it does bear the original catalogue number and packaging.

How to buy

A Paean To Wilson [Kooky Records/Cargo, 2LP blue vinyl] is available to pre-order/buy via Cargo.

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11 October 2017

The Guitar and Other Machines [FBN 204]

The Guitar and Other Machines [FBN 204 CD]

2LP: UK 12.01.18 (Factory Benelux, FBN 204)

Tracklisting

Side A

1. Arpeggiator
2. What It Is to Me (Woman)
3. Red Shoes
4. Jongleur Grey
5. When the World
6. U.S.P.

Side B

1. Bordeaux Sequence
2. Pol in B
3. English Landscape Tradition
4. Miss Haymes
5. Don’t Think You’re Funny

Side C

1. Arpeggiator (live)
2. Our Lady of the Angels (live)
3. Pol in B (live)
4. Miss Haymes (live)

Side D

1. When the World (live)
2. English Landscape Tradition (live)
3. Bordeaux Sequence (live)

Notes

Deluxe double vinyl edition of the sixth studio album originally released by Factory Records in 1987.

The origin of The Guitar and Other Machines was the Christmas present given by Factory founder Tony Wilson to Durutti mainman Vini Reilly in 1985. "He gave me another kick and bought me a load of electronic instruments," revealed Reilly at the time. "I never dreamt of getting into this electronic thing, and I struggled and fought and stayed up til half seven in the morning and really worked on it. I know that Tony's got this vision and I persevered. And I found a way of using a sequencer that isn't like New Order – it's my way, and it's my music."

Produced by Stephen Street (The Smiths; Morrissey), the album also features percussionist Bruce Mitchell and viola player John Metcalfe.

The second record features selected recordings of the band performing live at the Bottom Line club in NYC in October 1987, plus two further live tracks from WOMAD in August 1988.

The double vinyl set comes in a gatefold sleeve featuring original artwork by 8vo. A 3CD edition will also be available.

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09 October 2017

The Guitar and Other Machines [FBN 204 CD]

The Guitar and Other Machines [FBN 204 CD]

LP: UK 12.01.18 (Factory Benelux, FBN 204 CD)

Tracklisting

CD1

1. Arpeggiator
2. What It Is to Me (Woman)
3. Red Shoes
4. Jongleur Grey
5. When the World
6. U.S.P.
7. Bordeaux Sequence
8. Pol in B
9. English Landscape Tradition
10. Miss Haymes
11. Don't Think You're Funny
12. Dream Topping
13. You Won't Feel Out of Place
14. 28 Oldham Street
15. LFO Mod
16. Catos con Guantes

CD2

1. Florence Sunset
2. All That Love and Maths Can Do
3. San Giovanni Dawn
4. For Friends in Italy
5. Our Lady of the Angels
6. Red Shoes (VR vocal)
7. Song for Les Preger
8. For Rebecca
9. Final Cut
10. When the World (Newson Mix)
11. Arpeggiator II
12. Pol in AB
13. 30 Oldham Street
14. When the World (Soundtrack)
15. Our Lady
16. White Rabbit
17. When the World (Version)

CD3

1. Prayer (live)
2. Arpeggiator (live)
3. Our Lady of the Angels (live)
4. Pol in B (live)
5. Miss Haymes (live)
6. For Mother (live)
7. Requiem (live)
8. Jacqueline (live)
9. Elevator Sequence (live)
10. The Missing Boy (live)
11. When the World (live)
12. Tomorrow (live)
13. English Landscape Tradition (live)
14. Bordeaux Sequence (live)

Notes

Expanded 3CD deluxe edition of the sixth studio album originally released by Factory Records in 1987.

The origin of The Guitar and Other Machines was the Christmas present given by Factory founder Tony Wilson to Durutti mainman Vini Reilly in 1985. "He gave me another kick and bought me a load of electronic instruments," revealed Reilly at the time. "I never dreamt of getting into this electronic thing, and I struggled and fought and stayed up til half seven in the morning and really worked on it. I know that Tony's got this vision and I persevered. And I found a way of using a sequencer that isn't like New Order – it's my way, and it's my music."

Produced by Stephen Street (The Smiths; Morrissey), the album also features percussionist Bruce Mitchell and viola player John Metcalfe. Remastered in 2017, this new FBN edition restores all three bonus tracks included on the original Factory CD, being experimental pieces written and recorded with Jez Kerr and Simon Topping of A Certain Ratio.

CD2 features many associated recordings, including the rare Greetings 3 EP (released only in Italy), non-album tracks such as Our Lady of the Angels, LFO Mod, acoustic instrumental Catos con Guantes, various mixes of When the World, Jefferson Airplane cover White Rabbit, and several ‘sporadic recordings' which revisit themes first heard on the original album.

CD3 features a recording of the band live at the Bottom Line club in NYC in October 1987, plus two further live tracks from WOMAD in August 1988.

The 3CD set is housed in a clamshell box with individual interior wallets. A 2LP vinyl edition will also be available, featuring the core studio album plus live versions of selected album tracks on Disc 2.

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15 September 2017

Greetings Three (Tiger Bay, 2017, TB6157)

Greetings Three (Tiger Bay, 2017

LP: UK 15.09.17 (Tiger Bay, TB6157)

Tracklisting

Side One

Florence Sunset
All That Love And Maths Can Do

Side Two

San Giovanni Dawn
For Friends In Italy

Notes

180 gram, 45rpm vinyl reissue of Greetings Three by The Durutti Column on 12" vinyl on Tiger Bay via Song Cycle Records.

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04 April 2017

Noblesse Oblige [FBN 125 / TWI 1234]

Noblesse Oblige [FBN 125 / TWI 1234]

CD: UK 01.04.17 (Factory Benelux, FBN 125; Les Disques du Crépuscule, TWI 1234; approx release date)

Tracklisting

1. Cathy Claret - Todo Se Va
2. Isabelle Antena - Over You
3. Marsheaux - Treasure
4. White Sea - Gangster No. 1
5. Fritz Catlin - Shooting the Hunter
6. Maxwell Sterling - The Death of Juno
7. Blaine L. Reininger - Demis
8. Jean-Marc Lederman - A Darker Snare
9. Ultramarine - Equatorial Calms
10. Dislocation Dance -Songs That I Like
11. ElutzC!a
12. The Names - Spectators of Life (2013)
13. Minny Pops - Island (Remix)
14. Paul Haig - Do We Have the Time?
15. The Durutti Column - Requiem For a Father (live 1980)

Credits

A selection of tracks from new releases in 2016 and 2017. Printed and manufactured in EU. Design by Pascal Blua. With thanks to all the artists appearing and to MD for the title. For promotional use only - not for resale.

Notes

Requiem for a Father (live 1980) was recorded at Leeds Polytechnic on 7 October 1980 and features on the vinyl version of LC (FBN 10).

Noblesse Oblige is a free sampler CD from Factory Benelux and Les Disques du Crépuscule featuring new and rare tracks from our current releases in 2016/17, together with several exclusives, and tracks from selected label friends. It's available free when you order two or more CDs, vinyls, teeshirts or card sets via our mailorder service (i.e. two or more items in total). Please note - FBN 125 will not available in the shops!

FBN 125 is housed in a card wallet designed by Pascal Blua.

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30 March 2017

Short Stories For Pauline [Factory Benelux, RSD, 2017]

Short Stories For Pauline [Factory Benelux, FBN 36, Record Store Day, 2017]

LP: UK 22.04.17 (Factory Benelux, FBN 36)

Tracklisting

Side One

At First Sight
Duet
College
Invitations
Destroy, She Said
Model
Journeys By Vespa

Side Two

Take Some Time Out
A Silence
Mirror A
Cocktail
Telephone Call
Mirror B
A Room in Southport

Notes

Clear vinyl limited edition (500 copies only) of 'Short Stories for Pauline', the 'lost' fourth album by cult Manchester group The Durutti Column.

This special Record Store Day 2017 edition features a new cover image by photographer Mark Warner.

A Record Store Day 2017 release which will only be available to buy in-store for at least one week from the 22 April 2017 release date (subject to availability).

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01 March 2017

Domo Arigato [Factory Benelux, 2017]

Domo Arigato (FBN 52)

3CD + DVD, 2LP + 7": UK 26.05.17 (Factory Benelux, FBN 52)

Tracklisting

CD1

1. Sketch for Summer
2. Sketch for Dawn
3. Mercy Theme
4. A Little Mercy
5. Dream of a Child
6. Mercy Dance
7. The Room
8. E.E.
9. Blind Elevator Girl
10. Tomorrow
11. For Belgian Friends
12. The Missing Boy
13. Self Portrait
14. Audience Noise

CD2

1. Sketch for Summer
2. Sketch for Dawn
3. Party
4. Never Known
5. Mercy Theme
6. A Little Mercy
7. Jacqueline
8. Dream of a Child
9. Mercy Dance
10. A Silence
11. The Room
12. E.E.
13. Pauline
14. Conduct
14. Tomorrow

CD3

1. Blind Elevator Girl
2. The Beggar
3. For Belgian Friends
4. The Missing Boy
5. Self Portrait
6. Sketch for Dawn
7. Sketch for Summer
8. Jacqueline (1984)
9. Without Mercy (version) (1984)
10. Love Fading (1984)
11. Take Some Time Out/Messidor (1984)
12. Never Known (1984)
13. Dream of a Child (1984)

DVD

1. Sketch for Summer
2. Sketch for Dawn
3. A Little Mercy
4. Mercy Dance
5. The Room
6. E.E.
7. Blind Elevator Girl
8. For Belgian Friends
9. The Missing Boy

LP1

A1. Sketch for Summer
A2. Sketch for Dawn
A3. Party
A4. Never Known
A5. Mercy Theme
A6. Pauline

B1. Jacqueline
B2. Mercy Dance
B3. Tomorrow
B4. For Belgian Friends
B5. Self-Portrait

LP2

C1. A Silence
C2. The Room
C3. E.E.
C4. Conduct

D1. Tomorrow
D2. The Beggar
D3. For Belgian Friends
D4. The Missing Boy
D5. Self Portrait

7"

E1. Love Fading
F1. For Noriko

Notes

Disc 1 of the 4 CD set presents the original digital mix from 1985, while Discs 2 and 3 include the 2017 soundboard remaster plus a previously unreleased gig from Tokyo Loft Club on 29 April 1984. Disc 4 is an NTSC format DVD featuring a pristine transfer of the original Japanese laserdisc edition of Domo Arigato, which is the filmed version of the show with the 1985 digital mix.

A double gatefold vinyl edition is also available and contains a bonus 7" single, Dedications for Japan, in a facsimile picture sleeve. The 18 live tracks on the double vinyl format are all taken from the 2017 soundboard remaster and present the entire 1985 show (except for Dream of a Child and Blind Elevator Girl, which for reasons of space appear only on the CD version).

Available to buy direct from Factory Benelux Mail Order.

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29 July 2016

Tim Burgess Presents Vinyl Adventures from Istanbul to San Francisco

Tim Burgess Presents Vinyl Adventures from Istanbul to San Francisco

CD/LP/DL/Streaming: UK 29.07.16 (O Genesis ogen62lp)

Tracklisting

1. The Durutti Column - Otis
2. The Clash - Rebel Waltz
3. Lou Christie - Waco
4. Love - A House Is Not A Motel
5. Joy Division - She's Lost Control
6. Junior Wells Chicago Blues Band - Snatch It Back and Hold It
7. Allen Ginsberg - Goin' to San Diego
8. Duane Eddy - Rebel Rouser
9. Isao Tomita - Reverie
10. The Modern Lovers - Old World
11. Paul Simon - You Can Call Me Al
12. George Jones & Tammy Wynette - I've Seen Better Days
13. Loudon Wainwright III - The Drinking Song
14. John Grant - Grey Tickles, Black Pressure
15. Sibylle Baier - Tonight
16. Willie Nelson - Blue Skies
17. Fad Gadget - State of the Nation
18. Tchaikovsky - Symphony #6 in B Minor Final Adagio Lamentoso

Notes

Compilation curated by Tim Burgess on his OGenesis label to accompany his 'Tim Book Two' book and which features 'Otis' by The Durutti Column.

"The compilation, 'Vinyl Adventures from Istanbul to San Francisco', is recommendations of the great and the good in life from The Clash chosen by one of The Vaccines to Willie Nelson picked by one of The Clash. No rules. Love sit comfortably beside Joy Division, Isao Tomita next to Duane Eddy. And it's unlikely you'll find an album with music by Fad Gadget, Tchaikovsky and Allen Ginsberg."

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15 May 2016

At Twilight [Les Disques du Crépuscule, 2016]

The Durutti Column - At Twilight

Digital download / stream: UK 06.05.16 (Les Disques du Crépuscule, FBN 10)

Tracklisting

1. Lips That Would Kiss (Form Prayers to Broken Stone)
2. Madeleine
3. Sleep Will Come
4. The Eye and The Hand
5. Experiment in Fifth
6. Piece for an Ideal
7. Party
8. For Patti
9. Weakness and Fever
10. Zinni
11. Favourite Painting
12. Piece for out of Tune Grande Piano
13. Danny
14. Enigma
15. The Beggar - Live
16. Detail for Annik
17. Mavucha
18. Hommage to Martinu
19. Portrait for Paul
20. Piece of out of Tune Grande Piano
21. Snowflakes
22. One Christmas for Your Thoughts

Notes

Digital-only (no cd version) compilation album released on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify and other digital services in May 2016.

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30 March 2016

LC [Double vinyl LP + 7-inch single, FBN 10]

LC Double Vinyl plus 7-inch Single [FBN 10]

LP + 7-inch: UK 06.05.16 (Factory Benelux, FBN 10)

Tracklisting

LP 1

A1 - Sketch for Dawn (1)
A2 - Portrait for Frazier
A3 - Jaqueline
A4 - Messidor
A5 - Sketch for Dawn (2)

B1 - Never Known
B2 - The Act Committed
B3 - Detail for Paul
B4 - The Missing Boy
B5 - The Sweet Cheat Gone

LP 2

C1 - Danny
C2 - Enigma
C3 - Experiment in Fifth
C4 - Portrait for Frazier
C5 - Favourite Painting

D1 - For Mimi
D2 - For Belgian Friends
D3 - Self-Portrait
D4 - Zinnia

7-inch single

E1 - Sketch for Summer (live)
F1 - Requiem for a Father (version) (live)

Notes

LC, the classic second studio album by The Durutti Column from 1981 is released in a very special double vinyl edition on 6 May 2016 by Factory Benelux.

The original album is supplemented by 9 bonus tracks on the second record. These include the rare Sordide Sentimental single Danny/Enigma and the three Durutti tracks from A Factory Quartet.

The remastered 2LP set is housed in a gatefold sleeve printed on matt reverse board, with liner notes and archive images. The package also includes an exclusive 7-inch single featuring live versions of Sketch for Summer and Requiem for a Father, recorded at Leeds Polytechnic in October 1980. These are the earliest surviving professional live recordings of The Durutti Column in concert.

For ordering details please visit the Factory Benelux shop.

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06 February 2016

Amigos Em Portugal [LOTTA001]

The Durutti Column - Amigos Em Portugal (LOTTA001)

LP/CD: UK 24.01.16 (DURUTTI, LOTTA001)

Tracklisting

1
Amigos Em Portugal
Small Girl By A Pool
Lisboa
Sara E Tristana
Estoril A Noite
Vestido Amarratado

2
Wheels Turning
Lies Of Mercy
Saudade
Games Of Rhythm
Favourite Descending Intervals
To End With

Credits

DEDICATIONS FOR JACQUELINE
Music written and performed by Vini Reilly
Recorded and mixed in the Valentin de Carvalho Studios
by Tó Pinteiro da Silva & José Valverde
Published by Imagem Music
Copyright Control 2015
Originally released 1983
Digitally re-mastered 2015
LOTTA001
Design by Trevor Johnson & Sian Ford
www.durutti.co.uk
www.thedurutticolumn.com

Notes

Amigos em Portugal

Amigos em Portugal, foi editado em 1983 pela extinta Fundação Atlântica, uma editora criada por Amigos, um pouco ao estilo da Factory. Amigos esses que hoje, passados mais de trinta anos continuam as suas aventuras criativas, uns mais para a escrita e outros ainda na arte de fazer música em projetos como por exemplo os magníficos Madredeus.

Foi em 1988 que ouvi pela primeira vez a guitarra do Vini (no disco igualmente chamado Vini Reilly). Aquele som transportou-me para outros lugares e desde aí ficamos "Amigos".

O Phil Cleaver pediu-me para escrever umas linhas para a reedição de Amigos em Portugal e partilhar algumas curiosidades sobre o seu background. Em 2013, fui à procura de algumas respostas e fui descobrindo que Amigos em Portugal começa a ser pensado na visita dos Durutti Column em 1982 a Vilar de Mouros, um festival no Norte de Portugal. Tony Wilson era à data amigo do Miguel Esteves Cardoso que com alguns amigos deu início à Fundação Atlântica e convidou o Vini Reilly para gravar um disco. Segundo o Bruce, Vini foi até ao estúdio com a Francesca Wraith e gravou tudo muito rápido. Bruce não o acompanhou pois a sua mulher estava na altura doente.

O título da quarta música nasce quando Vini a mostra ao Miguel Esteves Cardoso e este diz que a melodia lhe trazia à lembrança as suas duas filhas... Sara e Tristana.

Por fim, falei com um dos Engenheiros de Som, o José Valverde que me confidenciou que a música dos Durutti Column era para eles algo de novo e que a gravação dos temas lhes deu algum trabalho, nomeadamente no apuramento da sonoridade e nas misturas finais.

Segundo José, o "Vini Reilly foi, em Paço de Arcos, pessoal afável, muito acessível na abordagem ao trabalho e ao que ele queria expressar. Calmo, introvertido e muito concentrado... é o que eu me lembro ainda".

Espero que gostem do disco,

Um Amigo, em Portugal
Luís Graça, Kingleer

Amigos em Portugal

Amigos em Portugal, was issued in 1983 by the now defunct Fundação Atlântica, a label created by Friends (Amigos), along the lines of Factory. Friends that today, more than thirty years later are still in their creative adventures, ones in writing and others still in the music scene with projects like the magnificent Madredeus.

It was in 1988 that I heard Vini’s guitar for the first time (on the ‘Vini Reilly’ record). That sound took me to other places and since then we have become... Amigos.

Phil Cleaver asked me to write some notes for the reissue of Amigos em Portugal and share some of the background about it. In 2013, I went looking for some answers and I've discovered that Amigos em Portugal starts in 1982 on a visit to Vilar de Mouros, a local festival in the north of Portugal. Tony Wilson was friend of Miguel Esteves Cardoso, one of the founders of Fundação Atlântica, who invited Durutti Column to record. So, as Bruce told me, Vini went to the studio with Francisca Wraith and recorded it very fast as he used to do it. Bruce didn’t go since his wife was ill at the time.

The fourth track title has particular story. One day, Vini played a track to Miguel Esteves Cardoso, who then told Vini that the sound reminded him of his two daughters... Sara and Tristana.

Finally, I've spoken to one of the sound engineers, José Valverde. He told me that Durutti Columns's sound was something new at the time for them and they had a hard job with most of the tracks, specifically to shape the sound and create the final mix. Vini – for José – was very easy going, calm and highly focused.

I hope you enjoy the record.

A Friend in Portugal
Luís Graça, Kingleer


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Live At The Venue [LOTTA002]

The Durutti Column - Live At The Venue [LOTTA002]

LP + CD: UK 24.01.16 (DURUTTI, LOTTA002)

Tracklisting

1
Party
Mother From Spain
Jacqueline
Conduct
Sketch For Summer
The Beggar

2
Never Known
The Missing Boy
Sigh Becomes A Scream
Self Portrait
Friends In Belgium

Credits

Live at The Venue London, 6 April 1982

Vini Reilly - Guitar, Piano, Vocals
Bruce Mitchell - Percussion

All songs written by Durutti Column
Published by Imagem Music
Copyright Control 2016

Originally released 1983
Digitally re-mastered 2015
LOTTA002
Design by Trevor Johnson & Sian Ford
www.thedurutticolumn.com
www.durutti.co.uk

Notes

To follow.

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05 December 2015

Various Artists - Ni D'Eve, Ni D'Adam [TWI 1235 CD]


The Durutti Column donates the track Detail for Annik (a previously unheard instrumental performed by Vini Reilly in 1980, now dedicated to the memory of Crépuscule and Factory Benelux co-founder Annik Honoré) to Ni D'Eve, Ni D'Adam, a compilation CD of fresh tracks by new and heritage artists to mark 35 years of Les Disques du Crépuscule which is released on 15 January 2016.

Curated by Michel Duval and James Nice, Ni d’Eve, Ni d’Adam gathers together recent songs and instrumentals from Durutti and other Crépuscule favourites such as Antena, Paul Haig, Anna Domino, Blaine L. Reininger, The Names and 23 Skidoo, as well as more recent collaborators Marnie, Marsheaux and Ultramarine. In addition the collection features new songs by guests including Clou, Wrangler, Spleen, Pascal Comelade and Les Panties, plus an acclaimed version of Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet by Gavin Bryars, performed by pianist Maxence Cyrin.

The CD is sleeved in a 6-panel matt board digipack with artwork by Clou and notes by Michel Duval.

Tracklisting

1. Marnie - The Hunter
2. Wrangler - Harder
3. Spleen ft. CocoRosie - Beautiful Smell
4. Deux Filles - Her New Master
5. Clou - May the Force Be With You
6. Les Panties - Diving
7. Blaine L. Reininger - Anstrigone
8. Maxence Cyrin - Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet
9. Marsheaux - Ghost/Hammer
10. Section 25 - Mirror
11. 23 Skidoo - Calypso
12. Ultramarine - Eye Contact
13. Antena - Le Spinner
14. Paul Haig - Four Dark Traps
15. Kid Montana + Anna Domino - The Last Love Song
16. The Names - My Angel of Death
17. Pascal Comelade - Despintura (a) Fonica
18. The Durutti Column - Detail for Annik

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14 November 2015

Ghosts of Christmas Past [TWI 158 CD]

Ghosts of Christmas Past (TWI 158 CD)
2CD: UK 30.11.15 (Les Disques du Crépuscule, TWI 158 30 CD)

Tracklisting

Disc 1

1. Section 25 - Jesus Sweetly Sleeps
2. Miranda Dali - Happy Xmas (War Is Over)
3. The Wake - Jesus From the Block
4. Marsheaux - We Met Bernard Sumner at a Christmas Party Last Night
5. Ultramarine - Winter Circle
6. Isolation Ward - Lamina Christus
7. Thick Pigeon - Jingle Bell Rock
8. Aztec Camera - Hot Club of Christ
9. Paul Haig - Scottish Christmas
10. B Music - Rocking Carol
11. Tuxedomoon - Weihnachtsrap
12. Virna Lindt - Festivo
13. Blaine L. Reininger - Jingle Hell
14. Blaine L. Reininger - Silent Blight
15. Blaine L. Reininger - Xmas Blooz
16. The Durutti Column - Snowflakes
17. Monks in the Snow - A Theme for This Special Evening

Disc 2

1. Hillcrest Club - Breakfast at Christmas
2. Paul Haig - Christiana
3. The Names - Tokyo Twilight
4. The Durutti Column - One Christmas For Your Thoughts
5. White Birds - Possessed By the Stars
6. The Swinging Buildings - Praying for a Cheaper Christmas
7. B Music - Ode to Joy
8. Antena - Noelle a Hawai
9. The Pale Fountains - Benoît’s Christmas
10. The French Impressionists - Santa Baby
11. Simon Topping - Peep Show International
12. Thick Pigeon - Silhouettes
13. Deux Filles - The Snow Falls and the Village Is Overflowing With Children
14. Mikado - Message de Noël
15. Winston Tong - The Twelve Days of Christmas
16. The Arcadians - Write Your Letter
17. Michael Nyman - Cream or Christians
18. Magazzini Criminali - Honolulu 25 dicembre 1990

Notes

Les Disques du Crépuscule presents an expanded edition of classic festive album Ghosts of Christmas Past, featuring favourites from the original 1981 and 1982 editions now joined by newer tracks by Crépuscule artists. It's released on 30 November 2015 as TWI 158 CD.

Sometimes witty, sometimes melancholic, the original version of Ghosts of Christmas Past in November 1981 featured exclusive contributions from luminaries such as Tuxedomoon, The Durutti Column, Paul Haig, Michael Nyman, Aztec Camera, Thick Pigeon and The Names. Subsequent editions in 1982 and 1986 added songs by Antena, Mikado, The French Impressionists, Pale Fountains and Winston Tong.

The two Durutti Column tracks are Snowflakes and One Christmas For Your Thoughts.

For this new double CD version in 2015 Crépuscule have now added more chantons noel by Blaine L. Reininger, Section 25, The Wake, Marsheaux, Deux Filles, Stanton Miranda, Virna Lindt, B Music and Ultramarine.

Festive cover art is by Jean-Francois Octave and the remastered 2CD package comes in a deluxe 6-panel digipack.

Available to buy direct from Les Disques du Crépuscule mail order.

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12 July 2015

Another Setting [FBN 30 CD]

Another Setting [Factory Benelux FBN 30 CD]
CD + Digital Download: UK 18.09.15 (Factory Benelux FBN 30 CD)

Tracklisting

1. Prayer
2. Response
3. Bordeaux
4. For a Western
5. The Beggar
6. Francesca
7. Smile in the Crowd
8. You've Heard It Before
9. Dream of a Child
10. Second Family
11. Spent Time
12. I Get Along Without You Very Well
13. Love Fading
14. For Noriko
15. Bordeaux (live at WOMAD
16. The Beggar (live at La Cigale)
17. Piece for Out of Tune Grande Piano

Notes

Factory Benelux presents a remastered CD edition of Another Setting, the third album by The Durutti Column originally issued as FACT 74 and FBN 30 in 1983.

The 11-track album is supplemented by bonus tracks including I Get Along Without You Very Well sung by Lindsay Reade from FAC 64, Love Fading and For Noriko from the Dedications for Japan 7" single, live tracks and more.

Another Setting is presented in a 6-panel digipak on matt white reverse board, replete with the original Mark Farrow artwork and Jackie Williams cover paintings.

This release is available on CD only in September 2015 and to pre-order now via factorybenelux.com.

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08 December 2014

The Deeply Vale Box Set [Ozit Dandelion, 2014]

The Deeply Vale Box Set

6CD: UK 08.12.14 (Ozit Dandelion, OZITDAN976CD)

Tracklisting

Disc 1

1. Killer Man Giro - Deeply Vale
2. Luke Bainbridge - Memories recorded 2005 / The Joint Rolling Contest (Featuring Eddie Klejdys)
3. Murmo Schulze - Our First Number (live DV)
4. The Tunes - In The Car (live DV)
5. Ruts - It Was Cold (live DV)
6. Blue Midnight - Before (feat Grant Showbiz)
7. Body - Andromeda (live DV)
8. The Out - Hearsay
9. Aqua - Human Zoo (live DV)
10. FreeRide - Funk 99
11. Victim - Why are Fire Engines Red?
12. Fast Cars - Images
13. Tractor - Roll The Dice
14. The Fall - Bingo Master's Break Out (live DV)
15. Stuffed Badgers - Gassing Badgers
16. Visitor 2035 - Toefunk (live DV)
17. Tony Crabtree - The Banks Of Pontrathrain

Disc 2

1. Mudanzas - Ebow
2. George Borowski - She finds Me
3. Danny & The Dressmakers - Ernie Bishops Dead Body
4. Danny & The Dressmakers - What Are We Doing On At A Rock Festival?
5. Danny & The Dressmakers - How Hot Is A Match?
6. Danny & The Dressmakers - Johnny Be Really Fucking Good
7. Here & Now - Strawberry (live DV)
8. Victor Brox Blues Train - Run You Off The Hill
9. Accident On The East Lancs -We want it legalised
10. Elti - fits - 30 miles per hour in a built up zone
11. Piccadilly Radio Interview Part 1
12. Steve Hillage - Getting Better (live DV)
13. The David Bacha Band - What You See Is What You Get (Foggy's Beautiful Friday Night Remix)
14. Pete Farrow - Candy Man
15. Trevor Hyett - You Just Can't Make It
16. Victor Brox Blues Train - Sister Kate (Dave Lunt bass Lol Coxhill soprano Joe Silmon clarinet Dave Hassell Drums)
17. Howard the Duck Too Late To Dance
18. Victor Drago - Black Leather Play With Fire

Disc 3

1. Visitor 2035 - Moving in the Direction of Love (live DV)
2. Tony Crabtree - Little Wing
3. Rivington Spike [Poet] - Untitled (live DV)
4. No Change - Ruin (live DV)
5. Here & Now - My Band's Better Than Your Bong (live DV)
6. Drive By Night - Time
7. Nik Turner's Sphinx - The Awakening
8. Drive By Night - Look Out
9. Grant Showbiz & Blue Midnight - Goodnight
10. Pete Farrow - Daydreamer
11. John Keegan - Yearning For The Human Race To Run
12. The Fall - Brand New Cadillac (live DV)
13. No Change - Lament (live DV)
14. Rockslide [forerunner of the Drones] - Hard On Me (live DV)
15. Murmo Schulz - The Death Pulse live at Deeply Vale
16. Bill Pod & The Stocks - Funky Mungbean

Disc 4

1. Accident On The East Lancs - Wasted
2. John Keegan - Me & The Green Machine
3. Piccadilly Radio Interview Part 2
4. Ruts - SUS (live DV)
5. Elti - fits
6. Fast Cars - Who Loves Jimmy Anderton (live DV)
7. Howard The Duck - You Know Me (live DV)
8. Durutti Column - Boxes (live DV)
9. Aspell - Damson (live DV)
10. The Tunes - Untitled (live DV)
11. Body - Death To Those Who Believe In It (live DV)
12. SFW - True Life
13. Here & Now - Hairy Barber (live DV)
14. Not Sensibles - I Am The Bishop
15. Tractor - Lost On The Ocean
16. Vibrant Thigh - Walking Away

Disc 5

1. Pete Farrow - Underwater Guitarist
2. Elti - fits
3. Trevor Hyett - There's No Such Thing As Too Much Fun
4. Steve Hillage - U.F.B (live DV)
5. Dr. Fogg's Mistik Misfits - Valley Of Dreams (Improvisation)
6. Ruts - Jah Wars (live DV)
7. Andy T - Bring What You Expect To Find
8. Nik Turner's Sphinx -God Rock (live DV)
9. Deeply Vale 1977 Radio Interview - at a garden in Cumberland Road Rochdale
10. Fast Cars - Tameside Girls (live DV)
11. Wilful Damage - Living In A Prison
12. Wilful Damage - Proton Neutraliser
13. Wilful Damage - I'm Scared
14. Wilful Damage - Peace & Life
15. Wilful Damage - Vandals
16. Wilful Damage - Encore (Featuring Eddie Kledjys)
17. Bill Normal on Banjo - My Fathers Woolly (live DV)
18. The Young Banjo player - leaning on a lampost (live DV)
19. Movement Banned (Wigwam/ Rev Mike Huck) - Bartimaes (live DV)

Disc 6

1. Tractor - Revolution Man
2. John Keegan - White Sand
3. Red Eyes - Deeply 96
4. Brenda and the Hot Dicks - Bored (live DV)
5. Tony Crabtree - Needle of death
6. The Durutti Column - Halitosis (live DV)
7. No Mystery feat Victor Brox - Big Boss Man
8. Whitefire - Jam Improv
9. Bob Jones - Near Enough For Jazz!!! (live DV)
10. The Trend - That's The Way the Cookie Crumbles (live DV)
11. Salford Jets - Pretty Babe
12. Salford Jets - Cadillac (Slight Return)
13. Brian Eastwood and Tom Winstanley - Deeply Vale
14. Aspell - Raspberry (live DV)
15. Tractor - Bring What You Expect to find
16. Durutti Column - I Like It / I Hate It (live DV)
17. Danny & The Dressmakers - Alfie Wimbush (live DV)
18. Danny & The Dressmakers - I Hate Julia (live DV)
19. Danny & The Dressmakers - Ernie Bishops Dead Body (Slight Return) (live DV)
20. Danny & The Dressmakers - Dynamite (live DV)
21. Alchemist - Rock Boogie

Notes

6CD set which includes 272 page A4 book and a pack of incense. Three tracks by (very early) Durutti Column are included.

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23 September 2014

Eclipsed (15 Tracks Of The Best New Music)

Eclipsed (15 Tracks Of The Best New Music)

CD: UK 23.09.14 (Uncut, Uncut 2014 11)

Tracklisting

1. Jesse Winchester - Ghosts
2. Steve Gunn - Milly's Garden
3. Ex Hex - Waterfall
4. Chris Forsyth & The Solar Motel Band - I Ain't Waiting
5. Philip Selway - Coming Up For Air
6. Lucinda Williams - Burning Bridges
7. Vashti Bunyan - Across The Water
8. Foxygen - How Can You Really
9. Mark Lanegan Band - Floor Of The Ocean
10. Martin Duffy - Snowbound
11. Mark Olson - Poison Oleander
12. Frazey Ford - September Fields
13. The Durutti Column - Free From All The Chaos
14. Caribou - Can't Do Without You
15. Weyes Blood - Some Winters

Notes

15-track compilation given away free with Uncut magazine featuring 'Free From All The Chaos' from the Chronicle XL album.

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28 June 2014

Chronicle XL [Kooky Records, kookydisc 60]

Chronicle XL [Kooky Records, kookydisc 60]

2CD + Digital Download: UK 07.07.14 (Kooky website pre-release 23:59 BST 02.05.14) (Kooky Records kookydisc 60)

Tracklisting

Chronicle One

Fanfare
Embattled Heart And Battling
Synergetic
Poppy & Pancho
The Rest Of A Life
The Water Colour Class - Feat. Jill Taylor
Nine Years
Party
Mello
Mercy In The Cathedral
To Raise A Gentle Smile
Pancho And Poppy
Fanfare Reprise

Chronicle Two

Free From All The Chaos - Feat. Caoilfhionn Rose Birley
Electrostatic - Feat. Caoilfhionn Rose Birley
Follow - Feat. Caoilfhionn Rose Birley
Misery - Feat. Caoilfhionn Rose Birley
Big Bill Rance
Vin + The Tabla Bong Guitar
Martin Jackson Was Here
Dry On The Rocks
Running Bass For Sharrock
The Changes Go Up And The Changes Go Down
Good Work Vin And Keir
Juan Montero & The Drum

Booklet

Contains photographs taken by Vini over his life including friends, family, people he has worked with and Red Kites (Milvus milvus). Bruce Mitchell has provided a background to the project; how it came about, the brief and where it ended up in the form of an essay.

Certificate

Each copy comes with a foil blocked certificate

Map

Every copy will have a random map. It will be a small part of Manchester detailing a location linked to his life. There are six in total and the mail order ones only will have all six.

Bonus Material In a Digital Format

And there is plenty of it! The third compact disc wallet will house a special insert. This will supply the unique download code required to access:

Bonus Audio

Live tracks - from the last shows - unreleased

Music stems from A Paean to Wilson - mix your own version

Gigography

Mike Mitchell's extensive details of the band's live performances

Bonus Visuals

More unseen photographs from Vini's personal collection

Promotional Photos

Press and promotional images of the band from the 1980's to the present.

There Was A Boy...

Accounts from fans and admirers of the artist.

This will all be housed in a custom-made box covered in claret coloured fabric.


Notes

500 presale copies sold direct by Kooky came with a numbered badge (utilising Bembo font) and all six maps. Presale copies are sold out.

Chronicle was originally commissioned by The Bridgewater Hall in Manchester ahead of a special concert in April 2011. This new version builds on from that version.

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The Return of The Durutti Column [Peter Saville Limited Edition LP/7"/CD, FBN 14]


LP/7-inch/CD: UK 06.2014 (Factory Benelux FBN 114)

In association with Peter Saville, Factory Benelux produced a limited edition of 10 unique copies of the FBN 114 vinyl re-release. Each features a bespoke abrasive paper seated beneath the Factory logo die-cut on the outer cover. Each paper features a different colour or texture, so that no two copies are the same. The package also includes a 12" square certificate of authenticity signed by Peter Saville.

The certificate and the inner bag on which the abrasive paper is mounted are printed on white matt reverse board and match the die-cut outer sleeve. The package is further differentiated from the standard 2013 release in that the inner bag features no text or images, and there is no sticker on the re-sealable polythene bag.

The special Saville edition also includes a postcard with a colour portrait of Vini Reilly taken by Annik Honoré at Palatine Road in 1980. Purchasers also received a complimentary slipcased CD copy of The Return of the Durutti Column (FBN 114 CD). The price per copy was 200 GBP.

This special edition is now sold out but the 10 papers available were:

1. Black - fine grit
2. Black - medium grit
3. Black - coarse grit
4. Burgundy rust - fine grit
5. Burgundy - medium grit
6. Burgundy - coarse grit
7. Green - medium grit
8. Dark green - medium grit
9. Yellow - medium grit
10. Black - emery paper

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31 March 2014

The Return of the Durutti Column [CD, Factory Benelux]

'The Return of The Durutti Column' CD Factory Benelux edition

CD: UK 05.05.2014 (Factory Benelux FBN 114 CD)

Tracklisting

1. Sketch for Summer
2. Requiem for a Father
3. Katharine
4. Conduct
5. Beginning
6. Jazz
7. Sketch for Winter
8. Collette
9. In 'D'
10. Lips That Would Kiss
11. Madeleine
12. The First Aspect of the Same Thing
13. The Second Aspect of the Same Thing
14. Untitled
15. Jazz
16. Sketch for Winter
17. Collette
18. Beginning
19. In 'D'

Credits

All tracks written by Vini Reilly and produced by Martin Hannett. Thanks are due to Pete Crooks, bass, Philip 'Toby' Tomanov, drums, and Eric Random, rhythm box program on 2/6 and 2/7. Thanks also to Gammer for his melody, and Wilson, Rowbotham.

--

Expanded Factory Benelux CD edition of the landmark debut album first issued by Factory Records in January 1980. As well as the 9 tracks featured on the first Factory pressing this 2014 edition includes the six 6 tracks which formed side two of the rare second pressing. Also included are the two Martin Hannett 'test card' flexi-disc tracks, and Madeleine and Lips That Would Kiss, both previously issued as a 12-inch single on Factory Benelux in October 1980.

The cover art restores the later Steve Horsfall jacket design issued by Factory, featuring three miniatures of paintings by Raoul Dufy. The booklet features period Durutti images by photographer Daniel Meadows, and extensive liner notes with quotes from Vini Reilly, Martin Hannett, Tony Wilson, Peter Saville, Daniel Meadows, John Brierley, Bruce Mitchell and members of Joy Division.

The album is available direct from Factory Benelux mailorder please!

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08 December 2013

The Return of the Durutti Column [LP, Factory Benelux]

The Return of the Durutti Column [LP, Factory Benelux]

The Return of the Durutti Column [LP, Factory Benelux]

LP: UK 03.12.2013 (Factory Benelux FBN 114)

Tracklisting

Side 1

1. Sketch for Summer
2. Requiem for a Father
3. Katharine
4. Conduct

Side 2

1. Beginning
2. Jazz
3. Sketch for Winter
4. Collette
5. In 'D'
6. Lips That Would Kiss
7. Madeleine

Side 3

1. The First Aspect of the Same Thing

Side 4

1. The Second Aspect of the Same Thing

Credits

All tracks written by Vini Reilly and produced by Martin Hannett.

Thanks are due to Pete Crooks, bass, Philip 'Toby' Tomanov, drums, and Eric Random, rhythm box program on 2/6 and 2/7. Thanks also to Gammer for his melody, and Wilson, Rowbotham, Reid and Debord for the sandpaper packaging concept. Die-cut based on a 1978 logo designed by Peter Saville. Portraits by Daniel Meadows.

Album with flexidisc first released in January 1980 on Factory Records (FACT 14).

Tracks 2/6 and 2/7 originally released in October 1980 as a 12" single on Factory Benelux (FAC BN 2).

Reviews

Paul Pledger / Flipside Flipside

--

New Factory Benelux edition on 12" vinyl in a special sleeve with an 11-inch square sheet of coarse glasspaper seated in a recessed deboss. The back cover features period photographs by Daniel Meadows.

The original Hannett 'Test Card' flexi-disc has been converted to a regular non-flexi-disc black vinyl 7" single and this brings commensurately better sound quality.

There are two bonus tracks on the main album itself, 'Madeleine' and 'Lips That Would Kiss' which previously came out on an FBN single in 1980.

Liner notes feature quotes from Vini Reilly, Martin Hannett, Tony Wilson, Peter Saville, Daniel Meadows, John Brierley, Bruce Mitchell and members of Joy Division.

The album is available direct from Factory Benelux mailorder from the beginning of December, priced at 25.00 GBP including UK postage. EU please add 4.00 GBP for airmail post. Rest of the World add 6.00 GBP for airmail post. The album will be dispatched in strong cruciform mailer. All enquiries about the album release, postage, etc direct to Factory Benelux please!

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30 April 2013

A Paean To Wilson (2LP, Kooky Records)

The Durutti Column - A Paean to Wilson; Tony Wilson and Vini Reilly

PLEASE NOTE THIS ITEM IS NOW SOLD OUT.

THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO BOUGHT A COPY ON RECORD STORE DAY OR ONLINE

2LP: UK 13.04.20 (Kooky Records, Kookydisc 35)
Download: UK 13.04.20 (Kooky Records) (via code redemption)

Tracklisting

One

I Or Are You Just A Technician
II Chant
III Quatro

Two

IV Requiem
V Stuki
VI Along Came Poppy

Three

VII Brother
VIII Duet With Piano
IX Darkness Here

Four

X Catos Revisited
XI The Truth
XII How Unbelievable

Download only: Heaven Sent (It Was Called Digital. It Was Heaven Sent) [Kookydisc 35]

1 Bruce
2 Keir
3 Neil
4 Mike
5 Alan
6 Anthony

Liner notes by Vini Reilly

A Paean to Wilson is part of a body of work which I started around the time that my friend, Tony Wilson died. Towards the end of his illness, I sent him an instrumental track and he loved it, so I decided that the right thing to do was carry on.

I was at the hospital when he died. We were very, very close. Afterwards, many things were done in his name. They were all about 'Mr Manchester', and about what Tony had done for music, art and literature. I didn't attend many of them. I'd just lost one of my closest friends and I had all the grief that you feel under such circumstances. Once I'd got my act together though, I decided to do something for myself and for Tony.

The Durutti Column was Tony Wilson's baby. We were the first act signed up to his Factory club night and the first band signed to Factory Records. Over the years we worked on many albums together and the one thing that Tony and I always argued about was that he thought that I should make music and write rather than sing.

After he died, I decided to make a body of work which did not have traditional song structures and which was concerned solely with the musical content. My only objective was to create some music that Tony would thoroughly approve of. I think I've done that and, if his spirit lives on - which I like to think that it does - I want him to know that this is for him. Vini Reilly

Credits

Musicians
Vini Reilly - Guitar, Piano
Bruce Mitchell - Drums, Marimba
Keir Stewart - Bass, Keyboards, Harmonica
Poppy Morgan - Piano
John Metcalfe - Viola
Tim Kellet - Trumpet

Ruby Morgan, Kate Williamson - Vocals

String arrangements by Ian Livingstone and Keir Stewart; performed by the Livingstone Chamber Ensemble. Recorded at Highfield Studios, Guildford, Surrey

Composed by Reilly, Stewart & Mitchell

Drums engineered by Seadna McPhail and recorded at Moolah Rouge, Manchester

Produced by Keir Stewart
Executive producer Bruce Mitchell

Mixed & mastered by Keir Stewart at Inch Studio, Manchester - www.inchstudio.com

The copyright in this recording is owned by Bruce Mitchell Productions

Photography by Stephen Wright
Sleeve by Trevor Johnson & Lynx Studio

Kookydisc 35

www.thedurutticolumn.com
www.kookydisc.co.uk

Manufactured in the EU

Notes

Double 180 gram vinyl edition produced in a limited edition of 497 copies for Record Store Day 2013 in the UK. Copies not sold in the shop subsequently offered by mail order to Kooky Records mailing list and other customers via thedurutticolumn.com and kookydisc.co.uk. Includes an envelope containing the Manchester International Festival programme and a large postcard featuring the original artwork.

Content of the album is the same as the CD version with the exception of a slightly different mastering overseen by Keir Stewart and the removal of the wind noise at the end (due to timing constraints).

The 'Heaven Sent' download tracks offered as CD2 in the original cd version (Kookydisc 29/2) are offered as a free download along with this vinyl edition and are exactly the same. Further bonus tracks were not offered but may subsequently be distributed by a means that remains to be determined.

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19 February 2013

Short Stories For Pauline [LTM, 2012]

Short Stories For Pauline [LTM, 2012]
CD: UK 24.09.12 (LTM, LTMCD 2508)

Tracklist

Short Stories For Pauline

1. At First Sight
2. Duet
3. College
4. Invitations
5. Destroy, She Said
6. Model
7. Journeys By Vespa
8. Take Some Time Out
9. A Silence
10. Mirror A
11. Cocktail
12. Telephone Call
13. Mirror B
14. A Room In Southport

Live In Bruxelles 13.8.1981

1. Sketch For Dawn (live)
2. Messidor (live)
3. Jacqueline (live)
4. Conduct (live)
5. Sketch For Summer (live)
6. Danny (live)
7. Stains (Useless Body) (live)
8. The Missing Boy (live)
9. Self Portrait/Version (live)
10. For Belgian Friends (live)
11. Interview

Notes

CD release for album released on limited edition vinyl LP by Factory Benelux (FBN 36). Packaged with free extra CD comprising Live in Bruxelles 13.8.1981 (LTMCD 2499).

--

LTM presents the belated full release of Short Stories For Pauline, the legendary 'lost' fourth album by cult Manchester group The Durutti Column.

Originally recorded by Vini Reilly in Brussels for Factory Benelux in 1983, the 14 track album features several exquisite pieces including College, A Room In Southport and, most notably, Duet. Recorded with Tuxedomoon viola player Blaine L. Reininger, this poignant instrumental proved -ironically- to be the downfall of the album, after Factory director (and Durutti manager) Tony Wilson insisted that Duet form the basis of an entire neo-classical album. As a result, Duet became Without Mercy in 1984, and Short Stories For Pauline was shelved.

Although individual tracks have appeared on several compilations, notably highbrow Crépuscule collection Hommage A Marguerite Duras, this is the first time the original 'FBN 36' album has appeared in its entirety. With new artwork prepared with the help of Crépuscule designer Benoît Hennebert, this set comes with Live In Bruxelles 13.8.1981 (originally release as LTMCD 2499) as a bonus CD.

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LC (Factory Benelux, 2013)

LC (Factory Benelux, 2013)
CD: BE/UK 11.02.2013 (Factory Benelux/LTM, FBN 10 CD)

Tracklisting

Disc one

1. Sketch for Dawn (1)
2. Portrait for Frazier
3. Jaqueline
4. Messidor
5. Sketch for Dawn (2)
6. Never Known
7. The Act Committed
8. Detail for Paul
9. The Missing Boy
10. The Sweet Cheat Gone
11. Danny
12. Enigma
13. For Mimi
14. For Belgian Friends
15. Self-Portrait
16. Favourite Painting
17. Zinni

Disc two

1. Mavuchka
2. Experiment in Fifth
3. Portrait for Paul
4. The Act Committed
5. Portrait for Frazier
6. Never Known
7. Untitled LC Demo
8. For Patti
9. Weakness and Fever
10. The Eye and the Hand
11. Party
12. One Christmas for Your Thoughts
13. Homage to Martinů
14. Sleep Will Come
15. Piece for an Ideal
16. Piece of Out of Tune Grand Piano

Notes

Factory Benelux presents an expanded double disc edition of LC, the second studio set by cult Manchester ensemble The Durutti Column, originally issued in 1981 and ranked among Vini Reilly’s finest albums.

After recording debut album The Return of the Durutti Column with producer Martin Hannett in 1979, virtuoso guitarist Vini Reilly purchased a TEAC four-track recorder from Bill Nelson and set about producing his own material. These evocative, highly atmospheric demos were perfected by Reilly at Graveyard Studios with co-producer Stuart Pickering, with additional drums and percussion from Bruce Mitchell, who has partnered Reilly ever since. Originally released by Factory Records in November 1981, LC is a key album in a body of work described by David Stubbs of Uncut magazine as "unique in rock, with Reilly's scampering, watercolour guitar style building a tentative bridge between post-punk and the chamber sketches of Debussy and Ravel."

On this expanded Factory Benelux the original ten tracks are supplemented by no less than 23 bonus cuts, including rare Sordide Sentimental single Danny/Enigma, 12" EP Deux Triangles, and the three tracks Reilly contributed to A Factory Quartet in 1980, his last recordings with Hannett and featuring Donald Johnson of A Certain Ratio on drums. The remastered double disc set also includes a clutch of scarce Crépuscule compilation album tracks, and demo versions of LC tracks, including a full length version of Detail for Paul.

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14 February 2013

LC (1972 label, 2013)

LC (1972 label, 2013)

CD: US 02.2013 (1972 / Revolver, IF51)

Tracklisting

1. Sketch for Dawn (1)
2. Portrait for Frazer
3. Jacqueline
4. Messidor
5. Sketch for Dawn (2)
6. Never Known
7. The Act Committed
8. Detail for Paul
9. The Missing Boy
10. The Sweet Cheat Gone

Notes

Production: Vini Reilly and Stuart Pickering
Design: Les Thompson

2013 CD re-release on the American 1972 label. Release notes state: "Vini Reilly's masterpiece, originally released in 1981. Includes Ian Curtis tribute "The Missing Boy". First-ever domestic (i.e. USA) CD release. No export."

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The Return of The Durutti Column [1972 label, 2013]

The Return of The Durutti Column
CD: US 02.2013 (1972 / Revolver USA, IF50)

Tracklisting

Sketch For Summer
Requiem For A Father
Katharine
Conduct
Beginning
Jazz
Sketch For Winter
Collette
In "D"

Original credits

The Durutti Column is Vini Reilly on guitar and Martin Hannett on switches
Recorded at Cargo, Rochdale
Mixed at Strawberry, Stockport
Engineers Chris Nagle and John Brierley
33 1/3 rpm
Published by Movement of 24th January Music
A Factory Records Product
(P) © 1979

Notes

Release notes state: "Reissue of classic debut album, originally released in 1980. First-ever domestic (i.e. USA) CD release. Produced by Martin Hannett (Joy Division, Magazine, A Certain Ratio, New Order). No export."

Production: Martin Hannett
Paintings by Dufy (Black sleeve reissue)

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28 April 2012

FBN 36 Short Stories For Pauline

FBN 36 Short Stories For Pauline

FBN 36 Short Stories For Pauline
LP/with Digital Download: UK 18.06.12 (Factory Benelux FBN 36)

Tracklisting

1. At First Sight
2. Duet
3. College
4. Invitations
5. Destroy, She Said
6. Model
7. Journeys by Vespa
8. Take Some Time Out
9. A Silence
10. Mirror A
11. Cocktail
12. Telephone Call
13. Mirror B
14. A Room In Southport

Credits

Personnel

Vini Reilly - guitar, vocals
Blaine L. Reininger - viola
Alain Lefebvre - drums
Anne van den Troost - harp
Eric Sleichim - saxophone
Pauline - backing vocals

Recorded at Daylight Studio, Brussels, 1983
Produced by Vini Reilly
Engineered by Marc François
Photography by Paul Coerten

Merci à Michel, Benoit et Bruce
2012 edition
M24J/LTM
FBN36

Notes

Belated release for the aborted Factory Benelux album. Limited edition of 1000 copies vinyl with free digital download. Original FBN 36 catalogue number has been assigned.

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13 November 2011

Fac. Dance

Fac. Dance
2CD/2LP/Digital download: US (Strut Records, Strut 087)

Tracklisting (Durutti Column only)

Madeleine
For Belgian Friends (Valuable Passages version)

Notes

From Strut Records: For 'Fac. Dance' we decided to focus on some of the label's early output, narrowing in on some key dance floor cuts that comprise some of our favorite 12 inches and late night classics. We were lucky enough to have involvement from some of the label's key participants, including iconic designer and cover artist Peter Saville. Our friend Bill Brewster of DJHistory.com assembled the compilation and contributes the liner notes.

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21 April 2011

Chronicle

Chronicle
CDR: UK 30.04.11 (Kooky Records kookydisc 34)

Tracklisting

01 Fanfare
02 Synergetic
03 Wild Beast Tamed*
04 Ananda
05 Accord
06 Time To Lift
07 Anguish of the Text Message
08 What Is It Worth
09 Someone Got Away
10 Jeeves and Wooster
11 Friends
12 Emptyness
13 No More Close To Me
14 Resolution

Music & Photography
Vini Reilly / Design TJ & HM
thedurutticolumn.com

* - credited on artwork but not on album due to being withdrawn at 11th hour

Limited edition initial copies were only available with a ticket at The Durutti Column's concert at the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester on Saturday 30 April 2011. Currently not on sale.

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21 February 2011

Vini Reilly [Kooky Records, 2011]

Vini Reilly (Kooky Records kookydisc 30/1 & 30/2)
Vini Reilly
CD: UK 17.01.11 (Kooky Records kookydisc 30/1 & 30/2)

Tracklisting (Kookydisc 30/1)

1. Love no more
2. Pol in G
3. Opera I
4. People's Pleasure Park
5. Red Square
6. Finding The Sea
7. Otis
8. William B
9. They Work Every Day
10. Opera II
11. Homage to Catalonea
12. Requiem Again
13. My Country

Tracklisting (Kookydisc 30/2)

1. Opera Two Demo
2. Finding The Sea - One
3. PPP Demo
4. Juan Montero Sketch One
5. Sample Tune
6. Finding The Sea - Two
7. Juan Montero Sketch Two
8. William B Demo
9. Sketches on Stratocaster

Credits

Bruce Mitchell – drums
Andy Connell – keyboards on 5,7 & 12
John Metcalfe – viola on 6
Rob Gray – voice on 9
Sola – voice on 4 & 6
Pol – voice on 7

Pre-production by Paul Miller
Production by Vini Reilly & Stephen Street
Engineered by Stephen Street & Nick Garside
Remastered by Keir Stewart at Inch Studios from the original 6” tape

Thanks to
Keir Stewart for remastering
Vini Reilly for the TDK demos
Dame Joan Sutherland

Published by the Movement of 24th January

Cover photograph by Mark Warner
Design by Trevor Johnson

Manufactured in the UK
All rights reserved

www.thedurutticolumn.com
www.kookydisc.co.uk

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02 August 2010

LC [4 Men With Beards, 2010]

LC; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissue

LC; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissue

LC; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissue

LC; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissue

LC; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissueLP: US 21.06.10 (4 Men With Beards, 4M522LP)


Tracklisting

Side 1

1. Sketch for Dawn (1)
2. Portrait for Frazer
3. Jacqueline
4. Messidor
5. Sketch for Dawn (2)

Side 2

1. Never Known
2. The Act Committed
3. Detail for Paul
4. The Missing Boy
5. The Sweet Cheat Gone

Credits

© 2010 Runt LLC
(P) 1981 & 2010 Factory Once/London Records 90 Ltd.
Produced under license from Factory Once/London Records 90 Ltd.
Manufactured by Rhino Entertainment Company, a Warner Music Group Company. Made in the U.S.A.

Notes

180 gram vinyl reissue of the debut album LC. Issued in a reproduction of the original sleeve (stickered in the top right-hand corner) with a plain white internal sleeve.

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26 July 2010

The Return of the Durutti Column [4 Men With Beards, 2010]

The Return of the Durutti Column; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissue

The Return of the Durutti Column; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissue

The Return of the Durutti Column; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissue

The Return of the Durutti Column; 4 Men With Beards 2010 reissue
LP: US 21.06.10 (4 Men With Beards, 4M521LP)

Tracklisting

Side A

1. Sketch For Summer
2. Requiem For A Father
3. Katherine
4. Conduct

Side B

1. Beginning
2. Jazz
3. Sketch For Winter
4. Collette
5. In 'D'

Notes

180 gram vinyl reissue of the debut album The Return of the Durutti Column. Issued in a reproduction of the black cover (stickered in the top right-hand corner) with a plain white internal sleeve.

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11 July 2010

Scream City SC5.1 CDR

Scream City SC5.1 CDR
CDR: UK 28.06.10

Tracklisting

Untitled Guitar Piece 1989 [1.46]

Notes

Free 10-track compilation CDR featuring live/rare/unreleased material by Section 25, Ike Yard, Thick Pigeon, The Names, The Wake, The Durutti Column, The Distractions, Biting Tongues, Shark Vegas and Fidelity Kastrow & Spartak (produced & remixed by Mark Reeder) given away free with Scream City fanzine in June 2010. The CDR was a strictly limited edition of 160 copies and is sold out.

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07 May 2010

Auteur Labels - Factory Records 1987

CD: UK 12.07.10 (LTM, LTMCD 2555)

Tracklisting

Catos Con Guantes 8:38

Notes

A collection of releases on Factory Records from 1987 in the ongoing Auteur Labels series. Released 12 July 2010. Available from LTM Mail Order.

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21 April 2010

Factory Records: Communications 1978-92 10" sampler

Factory Records: Communications 1978-92 10

Factory Records: Communications 1978-92 10

10": UK 17.04.10 (Warner, 5186592487)

Tracklisting

Sketch for Summer

Notes

One-off 10" single featuring tracks taken from the 4CD box set released in 2009, specially produced for and released on Record Store Day 2010 [Saturday 17 April 2010]. The 4-track 10" single also includes Transmission by Joy Division, Ceremony (Original Version) by New Order, and Hallelujah (Club Mix) by Happy Mondays.

Imagery to follow.

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16 September 2009

A Paean To Wilson (2CD)

The Durutti Column - A Paean to Wilson; Tony Wilson and Vini Reilly

CD: UK 09.10.09 (Kooky Records, Kookydisc 29/1 & 29/2)
Download: UK 25.01.10 (Kooky Records)

Tracklisting

Disc one – A Paean To Wilson [Kookydisc 29/1]

Movement

I Or Are You Just A Technician
II Chant
III Quatro
IV Requiem
V Stuki
VI Along Came Poppy
VII Brother
VIII Duet With Piano
IX Darkness Here
X Catos Revisited
XI The Truth
XII How Unbelievable

Bonus Disc: Heaven Sent (It Was Called Digital. It Was Heaven Sent) [Kookydisc 29/2]

1 Bruce
2 Keir
3 Neil
4 Mike
5 Alan
6 Anthony

Liner notes by Vini Reilly

A Paean to Wilson is part of a body of work which I started around the time that my friend, Tony Wilson died. Towards the end of his illness, I sent him an instrumental track and he loved it, so I decided that the right thing to do was carry on.

I was at the hospital when he died. We were very, very close. Afterwards, many things were done in his name. They were all about 'Mr Manchester', and about what Tony had done for music, art and literature. I didn't attend many of them. I'd just lost one of my closest friends and I had all the grief that you feel under such circumstances. Once I'd got my act together though, I decided to do something for myself and for Tony.

The Durutti Column was Tony Wilson's baby. We were the first act signed up to his Factory club night and the first band signed to Factory Records. Over the years we worked on many albums together and the one thing that Tony and I always argued about was that he thought that I should make music and write rather than sing.

After he died, I decided to make a body of work which did not have traditional song structures and which was concerned solely with the musical content. My only objective was to create some music that Tony would thoroughly approve of. I think I've done that and, if his spirit lives on - which I like to think that it does - I want him to know that this is for him. Vini Reilly

Musicians

Vini Reilly - Guitar, Piano
Bruce Mitchell - Drums, Marimba
Keir Stewart - Bass, Keyboards, Harmonica
Poppy Morgan - Piano
John Metcalfe - Viola
Tim Kellet - Trumpet
Ruby Morgan, Kate Williamson - Vocals

Composed by Reilly, Stewart & Mitchell

String arrangements by Ian Livingstone and Keir Stewart

Performed by the Livingstone Chamber Ensemble. Recorded at Highfield Studios, Guildford, Surrey

Drums recorded at Moolah Rouge and engineered by Seadna McPhail

Produced by Keir Stewart
Executive producer Bruce Mitchell

Mixed & mastered by Keir Stewart at Inch Studio Manchester. www.inchstudio.com

Thanks to:

Howard Sharrock
Alex Poots
Simon Mellor
The Kooky Gang
Phil Cleaver
Alex McMurtrie

Thanks to the Brothers McLeod. Hats off to Colin and Norman for building the best studio in Manchester - Moolah Rouge. Colin Adshead & the amazing 5003D mic amp and being patient with Keir's gear-tweak OCD, Dave Lunt for the Quad Valve Pre and instrument care. Daniel Courville in Canada for the ambisonic plugins.

Thanks to Bruce to all his family, all my family and all Morgans everywhere. Also thanks to Michael Pitrik for hair, Laurie Laptop, Alan Erasmus, Oli Wilson and all Tony's dear ones, Les Thompson, Mark Broscombe, Phil and Emma, John 'Cerysmatic' Cooper, Mark Prendergast, Gwyn and Pip and their beautiful family, and Hugh and Amanda Williamson.

Also to the Birmingham Three and all our supporters around the world! Special thanks to Bruce Mitchell for keeping me alive and Poppy Morgan for keeping me happy. Vini

Cover photograph by Stephen Wright
Other photographs by Ben Kelly, Dave John Norton, Poppy Morgan
Designed by Trevor Johnson & Haider Muhdi

5 024545 570328

Manufactured in the United Kingdom
P & © Imagen Music 2009
All rights reserved. Kookydisc 29/1 & 29/2

www.thedurutticolumn.com
www.kookydisc.co.uk

Reviews

A beautiful and entirely fitting eulogy

Tony Wilson always wanted Vini Reilly to make music. Reilly’s The Durutti Column were Mr. Manchester’s favourite band, and the first to sign to Factory Records - which ensures that 'A Paean To Wilson' is a deeply personal collection of songs, as Reilly grieves for the loss of his close friend. Be it the delicate Spanish guitar on ‘Quatro’, the lonely trumpet on ‘Along Came Poppy’ or the poignant Marvin Gaye sample (“Brother, brother / There’s too many of us dying”) on ‘Brother’, Reilly’s exquisite instrumentation conveys both an intense sadness and a celebratory joy.

'Paean To Wilson' is a requiem for the bond of eternal friendship, and a beautiful, and entirely fitting, eulogy.

8/10, John Freeman, ClashMusic.com

Wordless homage to late Factory Records chief

Vini Reilly's Durutti Column were the first band Tony Wilson ever signed to Factory Records, back in early 1978. Their bond was such that, when Wilson was ill in hospital, Reilly sent him new instrumentals to listen to and was at his bedside when he died. This rich and contemplative record is the fruition of that, forsaking traditional song structure for nagging loops, ambient flurries of guitar notes (spilling over into Spanish flamenco on "Quatro"), highly rhythmic percussion and strobing feedback. John Metcalfe's viola, particularly, is mood-perfect. It all ends with Wilson's damning verdict on New Labour. Ever the last word.

****, Rob Hughes, UNCUT 153, Feb 2010

Instrumental tribute to late Factory Records boss

"Championed by Tony Wilson for almost 30 years and present in hospital when the former Factory boss died in 2007, this is Vini Reilly of The Durutti Column's double-CD tribute to his friend and mentor. A sprawling, instrumental affair, it's also boldly eclectic, mixing the delicate acoustic pickings of Catos Revisited with the brooding guitar noise of Requiem and the Marvin Gaye-sampling Brother and The Truth, via new age, ambient textures and beautiful piano piece Anthony [actually on the bonus CD, 2005's Heaven Sent (It Was Called Digital. It Was Heaven Sent), Ed.]. Clocking in at 100 minutes, it might have benefited from some pruning, but this still makes for a fine tribute."

***, Phil Mongredien, Q

Notes

The album went on sale initially at the sold out Beyond The Loop concert at Kings Place in London on Friday 9 October 2009 priced GBP 15.00 [cash only].

The album went on internet presale in limited quantities via the Buy It Now Button for 15.00 GBP from 1-27 November 2009. It is now on general release as of 24 January 2010 and was sold at the gig at the Lowry in Salford on the same day.

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12 September 2009

The Durutti Column 2001-2009

The Durutti Column 2001-2009
5CD: UK 02.11.09 (Artful/Fullfill)*

Tracklisting

Disc one

Rebellion

4 Sophia
Longsight Romance
Geh Cak Af En Yam
The Fields Of Athenry
Overlord Part One
Falling
Voluntary Arrangement
Mello Part One
Mello Part Two
Protest Song
Meschugana
Everyone Loves Papa (XFM Session)
Teresa (XFM Session)

Disc two

Someone Else's Party

Love is a friend
Spanish lament
Somewhere
Somebody's party
Requiem for my mother
Remember
Vigil
Blue
No more hurt
Spasmic fairy
American view
Drinking time
Woman
Goodbye
Creole (XFM Session)
Spasmic Fairy (XFM Session)

Disc three

Keep Breathing

Nina
Its Wonderful
Maggie
Helen
Neil
Big Hole
Let Me Tell You Something
Lunch
Gun
Tuesday
Agnus Dei
Waiting

Disc four

Idiot Savants

Better Must Come
Interleukin 2 (for anthony)
Please Let Me Sleep
2 Times Nice
No Last Surprise
Gathering Dust
Whisper To The Wind
That Blows My Name Away (for rachel)

Disc five

Love In The Time of Recession

In Memory Of Anthony
Rant
More Rainbows
I'm Alive
For Bruce
Painting
Wild Beast Tamed
Rainbow Maker
My Poppy
Loser
Lock-Down
The Secret Between The Blade And Me
Duet For Piano And Guitar
Everybody's Laughing (I Don't Care)

Credits

To follow

--

5CD box set of the albums released on Artful/Fullfill during the period 2001-2009. Includes art prints of the individual covers. Individual discs contain bonus tracks originally only available on the Japanese versions of the original albums. The 6th disc which was originally thought to contain all the bonus tracks doesn't exist.

Available to from Townsend Records.

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15 July 2009

Four Factory Records [Kooky Records, kookydisc 027]

Four Factory Records; front cover detail
Four Factory Records

6CD: UK 15 July 2009 (Kooky Records, Kookydisc 027)

Tracklisting

Disc one

The Return of The Durutti Column

Disc Two

LC

Disc Three

Another Setting

Disc Four

Without Mercy

Live Bonus Disc

Messidor - Night Moves, Glasgow 19/02/82
Party - Night Moves, Glasgow 19/02/82
Danny - Night Moves, Glasgow 19/02/82
Mercy Theme - London School of Economics 14/12/84
Mercy Dance - London School of Economics 14/12/84
Prayer - London School of Economics 14/12/84
The Beggar - London School of Economics 14/12/84
The Missing Boy - London School of Economics 14/12/84
For Belgian Friends - Brighton Zap Club 15/12/84
Self Portrait - Brighton Zap Club 15/12/84
Sketch for Summer - Brighton Zap Club 15/12/84

Demo/Studio Bonus Disc

Intervals - Home recording 1978
Katherine - Home recording 1978
Untitled - Home recording 1978
Conduct - Home recording 1978
In D - Issued on second pressing of Return of
The Act Commited - Graveyard Studio demo LC
Portrait for Frazier - Graveyard Studio demo LC
Detail for Paul - Graveyard Studio demo LC
Never Known - Graveyard Studio demo LC
Experiment in Fifth - Graveyard Studio demo LC
Untitled LC demo - Graveyard Studio demo LC
Never Known - Four Track home demo
Mavuchka - released in place of Messidor in some territories on LC

Credits

Albums re-mastered from the original tapes by Keir Stewart.

RETURN OF THE DURUTTI COLUMN All songs written by Vini Reilly. Produced by Martin Hannett. Recorded at Cargo, Rochdale. Engineered by John Brierley. Mixed at Strawberry Studios, Stockport.



LC All songs written by Vini Reilly. Produced by Vini Reilly and Stewart Pickering. Recorded and Mixed at Graveyard Studios, Prestwich. Engineered by Stewart Pickering.

ANOTHER SETTING All songs written by Vini Reilly. Recorded and mixed at Strawberry Studios, Stockport. Engineered by Chris Nagle.

WITHOUT MERCY All songs written by Vini Reilly. Produced by Anthony Wilson and Michael Johnson. Recorded at Strawberry Studios, Stockport. Engineered by Michael Johnson; assisted by Tim Dewey and Nigel Beverley. Mixed at Britannia Row, London.

DEMOS / STUDIO All songs written by Vini Reilly. Compiled and mastered from studio and home demos at Far Heath Studios by Angus Wallace and at Kooky by Phil Cleaver. Thanks to Mike Mitchell.

LIVE All songs written by Vini Reilly. Compiled and mastered from original cassette mixing desk dates at Kooky by Phil Cleaver. Special thanks to Bruce Mitchell for the source material.

Liner notes written, and interviews conducted, by John Cooper. Archival album photography by Carsten Fleck. Designed by Steven Hankinson. / Kooky acknowledgements: Special thanks to Bryn, Iain, John and Simon (the 'kooky thinktank'); Bruce Mitchell and Mike Mitchell for the live and demo material; Oli Wilson for assistance in providing the original masters; Emma and Alison. Extra special thanks to John Cooper, John Cox, Darren Crawford, Steven Hankinson and Kerry Wadsworth for making this happen very well very quickly.

Vini Reilly acknowledgements: Thank you for keeping the ship afloat Mr Bruce Mitchell Esq. (The Gonzo Drum Master), Mr Keir Stewart for enabling Vini to record and producing beyond the call of duty, Brosci (the 5th member of The Durutti Column), all of Bruce's family, all of my family, all of Poppy's family (contributions from Kate and Ruby), Michael Pitrick for hairstyle, Phil Cleaver and Emma, Alex McMurtrie, John Cooper, Gary at Sounds Great, Damian my doctor, Joanne Ingleby (dental care), my harvest mouse (Sa Ding Ding), Mr Anthony H Wilson and extended family, Alan Erasmus, Les Thompson (and Jill), Laurie Laptop, Mark Prendergast (for forthcoming book), John Lennard and Savanna, Howard Sharrock (the great entrepreneur and friend) and Bruce Mitchell most of all - my best friend and the most superb drummer on the planet.

Liner notes [interviews by John Cooper except for Keir Stewart]

John Metcalfe

JC: I was reading some sleeve notes the other day and they weren't my sleevenotes, these were the sleevenotes written by Tony Wilson for the Factory Once reissue of Without Mercy. He described you as "the diminutive but taking no shit Mr Metcalfe whose viola playing became such a part of the next cycle of Durutti work". He describes you as "the arranger" of the brass section.

JM: To some degree that's true, because I was living with Tim Kellett and Rich Henry at the time and was very jealous when they joined Durutti a few months before Without Mercy was made. I was badgering at them to get me in there somehow if Blaine Reininger couldn't do it. So what happened is I went down to Strawberry with them, and I can't even remember what time of year it was, but I seem to remember it was dark when we got there. I think I remember sorting out a few chords for them and sorting out any little bits on intonation but they were really perfectly in tune so that wasn't really the case. But I think I pissed one of the engineers off. It was something to do with the tuning and I might've said "Is your tape machine running at the right speed?" and he looked very put out by that.

JC: Tony Wilson also mentions that he was trying to get Vini to slow down the recording process. Apparently he did slightly but basically it meant it took five days to record instead of three days! Does that fit with your recollections?

JM: To be honest John, my involvement was very minimal with that. I did one session where we turned up to do the brass and it took three, four, five hours... I can't really remember exactly how long but I think it was in the evening. And then I think we buggered off. Because I wasn't part of Durutti then, I was just a very keen Factory fan and was just sort of happy to be in there really, to have met Vini and Tony. But I don't think my involvement was as big as Tony's making out. I can't even remember how many tracks we did. Maybe three or four? Something like that. Maybe Tim, Rich and Merv went in there to do some other stuff. I only remember that one evening. I don't know how I came across but "diminutive and taking no shit", possibly, maybe... that's one way of putting it!

JC: So, what happened between that point and the following tour and you becoming a full-time member of the group?

JM: Well, I badgered Tim, Rich and Merv cos I knew they had these gigs coming up so I said if the violinist (Reininger) can't make it, get me in there. And that's what happened. I think Blaine Reininger had his own band over in America called Tuxedomoon and he was busy with that. I'm not sure what his connection with Vini was but we did meet him when we went to America eventually. But he couldn't do it so Tim said to Vini, look I'm living with this guy who plays violin and viola and he knows his stuff. So I remember I went along for the first rehearsal and it was at Bruce's house and we went in his back room and we started it up. I knew all the tunes because I was a big fan anyway and I remember Vini kinda laughing and saying "Well, you know it all don't you!? We don't really have to rehearse." And that was great. So I was in. If it was an audition, which I suppose it must've been, it went extremely well and I didn't look back really.

JC: And was this possibly one of the last times that The Durutti Column was known to rehearse?

JM: [Laughs] I think we might be rehearsing for the Manchester International Festival for one day. But then again I don't know. Vini was never one for rehearsing because the gigs were one of the brilliant things about him and I learned a hell of a lot from doing them. There was a lot of improvising and once Vini started using sequencers and technology he'd programme loops in and songs would run and as long as he (and we) thought they had legs for that particular moment in a particular show. So that was an interesting process because up until that point I was just "classicalling" away, being in bands and stuff. But in those bands we rehearsed to do the song over and over to make sure it was really tight. And then suddenly I was in a situation where Vini would just say "Oh, it's fine, just play". Of course there were tunes, there were melodies written and things but it kind of got more organised as the shows went on. Of course, over the years I got to know Vini and Bruce very well and to know their style. And that thing developed, when you do a lot of concerts with them, in that you know when they're going to stop and start.

Vini was great, he gave me a lot of free rein to do my own thing as well, which was fantastic. Vini allows my playing of the viola to become a more integrated part of the Durutti sound rather than just sort of being a bit of neo-classical decoration on the top.

JC: I seem to remember Vini saying how you were one of the few classical musicians who he'd ever come across who didn't need sheet music to play.

JM: Well, that's a great compliment and I think part of it was that I was rubbish at practising. When I was at the Northern studying, a lot of the time I was just sort of messing around really. Well, I did do some proper practising obviously but I eventually found that thing of repeating material over and over again to be a bit boring after a while. So I would just sort of mess around and make stuff up. So that was great. It was also good to remember loose structures of songs and just sort of make it up as you went along.

JC: Obviously, the Without Mercy piece does have that cyclical structure, it develops and there are various movements to it.

JM: I think that it's what you were saying about the re-releases to be as they were originally intended on vinyl. That record particularly crystallises that point because it was intended to be a long piece of music. It has motifs, themes that get developed and then get revisited. I thought it was a great record. I thought it really worked from that point of view. And at the time it was quite a brave thing to do.

JC: But we know Vini doesn't see it quite in such a favourable light. But perhaps he doesn't see most of his canon as being something that he wishes to revisit.

JM: I think the important thing about that record is that in some respects it was way ahead of its time. Around then, technology was really starting to make its presence felt. It was what, 1984. So you had a lot of bands with some sort of electronic element. Of course there was Kraftwerk but with the technology becoming more sophisticated and cheap more people could afford it. So there was a lot of purely electronic or rather purely electric music. So, guitars and drums but also with electronic boxes and things. And in the mid-80s there was a real move away from acoustic instruments in pop music. Big plastic snares. Lots of electronic bands like Depeche Mode, those kinda guys, were really at their height because the technology was leading the way and people were really excited by it. And I think at that point, to make a record that embraced the new technology but also included traditional classical acoustic instruments was really interesting. So it went from why are we still using rubbishy old classical violas made from metal and wood when there's all this other stuff going on. But of course, now it's come full circle because there's lots and lots of electronic acts starting to explore the possibilities of acoustic instruments and what those instruments can do acoustically and also when they are treated electronically. So, it may not be one of Vini's favourite records but I think it was quite futuristic in its own way.

JC: Do you see it in any way, looking back, as being influential on your later solo stuff?

JM: Oh god, definitely. Vini's music and Durutti had a huge influence. He's all over it. Of course, there are other groups and sounds that have influenced me but Durutti were a big part of my musical formative years and I was a big fan of that sound, especially the delay which led to the sound of Vini's guitar and the atmosphere that a lot of his music created. Not many people were using it and I can't think of anyone who was using it as much as Vini and I love that sound. And when I started writing music I used lots of the delay on most things to see what kind of patterns could be created. I think, to some extent, that I'm starting to move away from that but it's still very core to the way I conceive and write music.

Tim Kellett

JC: I think what many people would like to know is how come you got involved with The Durutti Column and ended up playing on both the Without Mercy album, the accompanying tour and also on a couple of other albums.

TK: Well, I had a horn section. I was on trumpet, Rich Henry on trombone and a guy called Mervyn Fletcher on saxophone. And we wrote Tony a letter. We'd seen him on Granada Reports, we knew that he owned the Haçienda and we knew that he had bands and things but we didn't really know an awful lot more than that. We were only about 19 I think. So we wrote him this letter saying "We've got this horn section, we're dead good, can you use us on any of your records?", thoroughly expecting him to not respond and not get back to us.
And I can't remember exactly what happened, but the legend is that he turned up at our flat in Hulme and said "I will hear you on Saturday morning at the Haçienda, I will give you an audition". And I remember walking down and seeing his green Mk II Jaguar outside the Haçienda and then we realised, because we knew he drove one of those, a favourite car of mine, we knew it was real. And it was quite a big deal for us.

We went into the Haçienda and there was litter everywhere because they hadn't cleared up after the Friday night. It was a bit like one of those Hollywood movie auditions because it was quite dark inside and there were three people up on the balcony, who I couldn't see because they were too far back, and it turned out to be Bruce, Tony and Vini. We didn't know who Vini was, or Bruce, at that point. Wilson said something like "Alright loves, play us something", so we played a bit of Charlie Parker and a few other things we'd prepared and, I don't even remember seeing him that day, he'd stayed up there, he was probably having a meeting with somebody, but Vini came down and introduced himself and said that he'd really like to use us for The Durutti Column.

So, we went home and did a bit of homework. In fact our flatmate John Metcalfe knew exactly who The Durutti Column was and he was green with envy, although it was only a matter of months before he'd managed to get into the band as well. That was through our recommendation as well because they had a guy called Blaine Reininger who couldn't make anything after a particular point.

JC: Yeah, Blaine played the strings on the album but then John stepped in for the tour.

TK: But Blaine played I think at the Riverside. I remember him there with a lady on cello who I can't remember what her name was... and a Cor Anglais player called...

JC: Maunagh Fleming.

TK: And I think it was all the people who played on the record who did that show.

JC: Caroline Lavelle?

TK: Yes, and that was it really. But it was an incredible opportunity and it was only really afterwards that I realised what a great start Tony had given me. That led to a tour of Japan, we went to Spain, we did a lot of gigs in England and a few recording sessions. I played on a number of albums. It was just the most amazing start. And that directly led to me being able to form the original line-up of Simply Red. And that was ten years for me and then after that I went on to do other things, something called Olive and now I write songs for other people but really the seeds were with Tony Wilson responding to that letter and letting us audition. One of the things for me, the great hallmark of his quality as a bloke was that he did give people a chance and I was one of them. I will always be grateful.

JC: I think that one of the first covers, if not the first, that 8vo did was Without Mercy and I think that came about through a similar kind of "Here Tony I want to design sleeves for you" kind of approach.

TK: Wasn't that a Peter Saville sleeve?

JC: No that was Mark Holt of 8vo just saying to Tony "look I wanna do designs for you". I can't remember the exact circumstances. But I think the history of Factory is littered with people taking the bull by the horns and Tony being equally keen to experiment with unknown talent basically.

TK: Yeah, he would respond to things like that whereas lots of people would just ignore it and not bother. He responded and he really cared about us and was really fond of our classical input I think. I think it appealed to him that we were from college as well. It was a mystery to us really, what this band was, with Bruce being a lot older than us, there was no bass player... It was very strange for us to get our heads round and then it kinda fitted into place and we realised what the deal was. I mean even that album cover, I remember us all looking at it and thinking "Oh, we expected it to be all glossy with our pictures on" but it looked like cardboard with a watercolour stuck on like a label. It was just a very very very strange world that we found ourselves in really and not at all as you would've expected. But we grew to absolutely love it and cherish it because it was so unusual and so special.

JC: It was a pretty exciting stage in the development of the band because at the time it was still only five or six years in the running and from the outset it was a full band, then it became just Vini and then Bruce came on and then to add at that point brass and strings instead of rocky things...

TK: It was an unusual line-up but somehow it worked. Ironically, the original line-up featured Tony Bowers and Chris Joyce who would later join me in...

JC: Simply Red!

TK: It came full circle.

JC: What happened in the end when you were joining Simply Red?

TK: I remember doing a gig at the Electric Circus in London. Tony was there and I just went on and did it. I was recording Picture Book, the first Simply Red album and remember asking Stewart Levine if I could get some time off to do it. So there was a little bit of an overlap. And then once the Simply Red thing took off I didn't play for ages. I think the last thing that I did with Vini was I recorded something in my studio called “G&T” and I also did some recording with him at Revolution in Cheadle, I don't know which album for again, I just did something. I don't think I probably heard the album. And then I haven't worked with him for years since then until now.

JC: Yes, you're coming back now to play the Manchester International Festival concerts.

TK: I'm just doing those concerts and I played a little bit on the record. I did a recording session for it at Keir's house but I haven't heard it. And I'm absolutely delighted that they've asked us back.It's lovely.



Oliver Wilson

JC: None of this would've happened had you not come across all the tapes for all The Durutti Column stuff in Tony's loft when you were going through it earlier in the year.

OW: Yeah, well I'm glad they all came to some use because they must've been up there for I don't know how long, twenty years maybe? When I was clearing all my dad's stuff out I found piles and piles of 8-tracks, tapes, this, that and the other by every Factory Records artist. And I thought, well what am I gonna do with 'em? I presumed that they were the artists' property so I thought I would return them to the artists. Quite a few Factory Records artists have come out of the woodwork to get their bits and pieces back. And I gave all these masters back to Vini and Keir and I was really happy when I heard that they were still usable and that they still sounded good. It's fantastic that we're getting some records out of them. I think it's great.

JC: Obviously the philosophy behind this re-release of the albums is that they are going to released as was originally intended. So it was obviously crucial that the original master tapes were used and one of the bugbears of previous releases has been that incorrect labelling of tracks, missing elements from those original releases. So this time round it has all been made possible.

OW: With the missing elements I wonder whether my Dad kept the masters was so that he could erase Vini's singing from them!? Maybe that's what you mean by elements missing? [Laughs]

JC: It's really that particularly on the first album that the tracklisting has always been a bit mysterious. The number of tracks hasn't been right and the names of tracks have changed on the credits.

OW: I didn't know that.

JC: So with the recording off the master tape it will be exactly what was recorded on the original album. But even the first album had a second version which had a slightly different acoustic mix.

OW: So not only has history been resurrected, history has also been rewritten.

JC: Yes, I guess with the Factory releases people almost got to the point where they expected something quirky and not quite right was gonna happen. And people would say "that's very Factory". But I guess sooner or later it helps to come up with the definitive version.

OW: It's taken a few decades but we've finally got the sleevenotes right!

JC: Yeah, well let's hope the sleevenotes are right! What I also wondered was what it was like growing up at a certain point during the history of Factory and what it was like growing up with Vini and Bruce.

OW: Well, I grew up with Vini really because he was very close to my dad. I always grew up knowing Durutti Column music from being a child. I grew up knowing Vini and Bruce, so much so that whenever I would have a tantrum as a child, Dad would put on a soothing Durutti Column number and it would always chill me out as a kid. It would stop me having tantrums if he put it on. And when I was older and started learning guitar I was one of the luckiest amateur guitarists in the world because I got lessons from Vini Reilly and that was a fantastic thing. Growing up I would go round to Vin's with my Dad and my Dad would skin up and I would sit there and watch and listen to Vin playing for a few hours. It was great. Not that I would partake in any smoking! Yeah, I've got lots of memories about Vini and The Durutti Column and the music is engrained in my mind and my soul and it's something I still listen to all the time.

JC: And I daresay the Durutti lullaby trick will have been repeated around the world by various fans who are now fathers.

OW: It wouldn't surprise me at all. It really is very good music for chilling kids out.

JC: I recently read how someone listens to it whilst walking around the supermarket. And I guess everyone has their own way in which they want to listen to his music. It gets very personal.

OW: It is very personal. It's very reflective music. It's something to listen to when you have a lot of thoughts about a lot of different things. You can just do a helluva lot with it. You can listen to it in so many places. You can apply it to a lot of different situations.

JC: And of course now we're coming up to the Manchester International Festival next month and Vini has written a new piece about your dad: "A Paean To Wilson". You must be pretty excited about the prospect of seeing that live.

OW: Yeah, absolutely. And the nearer its getting, the more excited I'm getting. I love going to see Vini play live and it's always great to hear the tracks you know so well. But it will be fantastic to go see him play a totally new piece of music. I'm hoping it's going to be a very moving experience as well. It will just be fantastic to hear what he's come up with for my Dad. He's written a track for my dad before, a track called "Anthony" on the Sex and Death album. But speech can't really put any kind of definition on how it feels to have that. It will be an emotional evening I'm sure.

JC: Yes, I know there will be a lot of people who will share that thought with you. I know that a lot of people will be making special trips over to see it over one or more of the three nights.

OW: It should be special because of the relationship that they had was so special. Throughout the years they were like brothers. Sometimes they were in love and sometimes they absolutely hated each other and they might go years without talking because Vin had pissed my Dad off. But it would always come back down to the fact that they were best mates and like brothers. My dad always said that Factory Records and all that kinda stuff, it wasn't so much business relationships it was a weird story of a group of blokes who had all fallen in love with each other. I certainly think Vin and my Dad had that connection.

JC: I think most people could see that was the case and how much they meant to each other because every time Tony was knocked down and then came back with a new incarnation of Factory Records, The Durutti Column was always one of the first acts to feature.

OW: Yeah, there was a real personal and emotional connection and that shows that there was a real musical connection as well. I was like thinking about the relationship over the years because you could have Acid House, you could have Joy Division, you could have New Order, you could have all the different things my Dad worked with and then there was always The Durutti Column. It was always such a constant with everything else that was going in my Dad's life. So that's always nice. It was definitely a good relationship for so long.



Bruce Mitchell

BM: Why don't let you let everyone know how we came to get hold of these master tapes for these albums.

BM: We'd wanted to remaster the first four albums anyhow. But by using Keir Stewart's skill... he remasters from anything frequently, he's very good at it. And Vini was saying if we could get hold of the original multi-tracks or quarter-inchers it would be the best thing to do. And I said to him "Well that'd be like Indiana Jones trying to find the Holy Grail!" Thirty-odd years ago Factory moved a lot, bailiffs would come piling in and out of all sorts of different events, there was lots of stuff that'd been seized. It had gone on for a long time but we've got to hand it to Tony because Tony kept a lot of stuff and kept it out of the firing line. And when Oli Wilson had to sort out a lot of stuff in Tony's loft after he died he got a pile of his friends, and I think you've already spoken to Oliver, he got some of his mates and in the stuff that they pulled out they'd got lots and lots of the original boxes, dating right back to the beginning of Factory. And they ended up, Oli I think organised the placement of them in the Museum of Science and Industry. He then told me and I then went down to the Museum, in the original old Roman bit of Manchester called Castlefield and a lot of their archive "caves" as it were sit underneath the railway line, the first proper railway line that run in between Manchester Castlefield and Liverpool. And there it was, a palette, a full-sized pallet piled high with Durutti quarter-inchers and multi-tracks, and I think we might've sent you a picture of it.

JC: Yeah, I think we have the picture on thedurutticolumn.com.

BM: I got back to our depot in Ardwick and had to use a forklift to move them about and that will be the picture you've got. Me and Keir Stewart with a yellow forklift in the background with a big pile of boxes. And some of the boxes, John Cooper, I actually remembered! Because there were one or maybe two boxes which were marked as "The Syd Lawrence Orchestra". They would just use any old big 10- or 12-inch boxes to put them in and the Syd Lawrence Orchestra used to record in Strawberry Studios and I remember this quite vividly from being in Strawberry Studios or Yellow Studios all those years ago.

JC: Was it also a case that tapes would actually be recycled in those days?

BM: Occasionally you do that and I must look more carefully. You'll sometimes get a label stuck over you know. It like archaeology isn't it? [Laughs]

JC: Indeed and the Durutti stuff aside there was also plenty of other Factory bands' tapes that were there as well.

BM: It's strange. I went down and signed them all out - though they will probably all go back into the Museum - and it meant that Keir could get his mastering process going from the originals. Now, I don't know... between you and me John, I don't really know if there is a discernable difference when you go to this trouble. But there is a big emotional difference in going to the original source (which is analogue as well). I don't know if you know the story but it's a bit like the Dean Benedetti Tapes. One of Charlie Parker's biggest fans was a guy called Dean Benedetti who went round all Parker's gigs recording everything. When Charlie Parker died, Dean Benedetti who ran this gigantic archive just disappeared. Nobody knew where this guy was. Eventually, many years later, after Clint Eastwood made his film on Charlie Parker [Bird], Dean Benedetti's brother popped up in America. Dean Benedetti had died in Italy and his brother had all his boxes of tapes and that was like The Secret of the Lost Chord, y'know, finding who the missing Charlie Parker music belonged to. And what they had is like a first edition book remnant and that's how it felt to me when we looked at these nice dusty, marked boxes. And, of course, I noticed that a couple of the boxes had been reused. But the right tapes were inside!

JC: Obviously you joined The Durutti Column only around the second album but what do you remember of the early days?

BM: It went like this. Vini or Factory got a commission to do a piece of music for Sordide Sentimental to commemorate a lady that died [Danny Dupic]. So Vin just came round to our house and we went into Stewart Pickering's studio, Graveyard Studios. And it's quite interesting, Graveyard Studios because it was next to a graveyard. And as I am sitting here in my wicker seat, talking to you John Cooper, I look out of the window and look straight onto a graveyard!

JC: Spooky!

BM: We went in to record “Enigma” and “Danny” and they were recorded very very fast. Vin would set up in front of the drumkit while Stewart Pickering got his levels right. Vin would look at me over the bass drum and say "This song goes like this" and then he would start playing and I would play along with it live. Then Vin would say to Stewart, "Right, we'll record this now". We'd record it live straight away and then once I'd finished Vin would say "That's fine" and then he would say to me, "Well, this next song goes like this"! [Laughs] The way Vin would play, the sequences had a unusual logic. When he would go through his changes it wouldn't be in strict four or eight bar formations, the chord changes would just seem to happen in a different way. He was very easy to play with, no problem at all.

JC: So, those tracks were recorded on pretty much the second play?

BM: Yes. Even now Vin really have a tolerance for it not going down immediately. Sometimes he would spend a lot of time putting things down and he doesn't like it. It's part of the progress of the maestro really. He just does it and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. LC was pretty much recorded live in a very similar way.

It went down very fast. It was all stuff that Vin had in him, ready to roll out. I listened to “Missing Boy” recently which I hadn't heard for such a long time. I remembered that when we put “Missing Boy” down, when it went to the piano overdubs, Vin, who was playing a grand piano in the studio, is putting these overdubs in like obbligatos. And it wasn't until quite a long time after, when he was doing the gig live, that he put these little piano pieces in places where he wasn't playing the guitar! So, you'll have seen him do that live, a call and answer on the piano. When you hear that recording the piano playing sounds fantastic. It went down very fast and very easy.

JC: The thing I was talking to John Metcalfe about is that apparently Without Mercy took a very sluggish five days to record.

BM: As you might know, Vin was pretty much press-ganged into doing Without Mercy. Vin always to get me into the studio to get stuff done. He was badgering Tony to get him into the studio so Tony said "Right, we'll do this but once you've done this you've got to do an album for me." So, Vin will promise anything to get into a studio so that was maybe Another Setting.

That was because it was a different sort of job. Michael Johnson was involved. Tony was the Executive Producer but really Tony was actually producing, he was there pretty much all the time. He was instructing every now and again the choreography of the Keats poem. My favourite thing is that Tony would tell Vini what sort of moods he wanted. There was a particular part of the poem where the Teutonic Knight would appear. So Vin says to Tony "I'll be playing but when you think the Teutonic Knights are showing up give me a nod" [Laughs]. So, he went in the booth and when Vini got the nod I think he just went up a semi-tone! [Laughs]. Which is absolute classic music busking to a degree.

Like, as you probably know, when James Brown asks the band to "Take it to the bridge" that's all that happens, it's just a semi-tone. It was Tony's album, it took a long time because it was in a different studio, Britannia Row, there were lots of overdubs. Vini, like with most of his albums, he slags Without Mercy off. But it was quite important. Tony was always looking for the proper direction for Vini's music and his feeling was that Vin should be doing all sorts of stuff and would have to allocate lots of energy to force Vini to do stuff that he didn't want to do. So, that's Without Mercy.

As I explained, to Vini a few weeks ago, one of the tracks on Without Mercy is being used on a Spanish film series. So, the music has value. All the musicians played great on it and we discovered the depths of the Metcalfe talent. A lovely clear approach to playing by Tim Kellett. Mervyn the saxophone player played some beautiful sax on “The Room” on the next album [Say What You Mean, Mean What You Say]. And we were saddled with those guys for a while. Fucking hell! And then they all blitzed off to do their own thing! [Laughs]

JC: What's your take on where Durutti Column fit in with the rest of popular music, or indeed any music?

BM: It's completely separate. And, for the market, very hard to pigeonhole. Vin was going along doing his tunes and his way. Most of us were around to support that kind of thing because you can recognise where you might put a contribution into the music but it can be ham-fisted so you always step back and let Vin guide it. Vin'll put stuff in, take it out but it always holds a certain mood.

JC: What do you think about this box set and the concepts of releasing the albums as they were originally intended?

BM: I like it and I've supported it from the beginning.

JC: Because obviously the albums have been released in a variety of guises...

BM: I'll tell you... I'm a fan of some things and it's just repackaging a lot of the time. I don't know about you but I'm quite capable of going and buying a better edition of a book that I already own, if it's a book or a writer that I always refer back to. It's like people who always want to own the first edition of a book. And I think it's the same in music. I suppose you've bought a particular piece of music on vinyl and then on CD. There seems to be an emotional need for wanting an artefact and if it's an original looking artefact, people want to own that sort of stuff. It was Tony, with the re-releases for Factory Too, he commissioned Mark Holt for most of them, where he did a pastiche of all the different artworks used. But, if I'd had me hard head on, on the way it should've been done, we would've just released them in their original artwork formats because I think people have a visual memory when they walk through a record shop. I know I have. You'll see a piece of artwork you remember from vinyl days, OK it's shrunk but it stops you, it turns into something you've got to own again.

JC: Do you know with the first time they came out on CD, with the box of four albums, sonically how do those recordings compare to the new remastered ones?

BM: I haven't listened to them because I don't trust my own ears. That's why we trust to Vini's version of it, or, better still, Keir's version! When we got Keir to do it, Cleaver said he was pleased with it. Have you heard them?

JC: No, I haven't heard them but I was just keen to know how they're shaping up.

BM: Keir got stuck into it and I've got every faith in them being sonically satisfying. But I won't be listening to them because I like to bump into a listening if you know what I mean. It's happened a lot with Durutti music. I've sometimes heard it play through the door in an apartment building. And I'll stop and I'll listen to this music and I'll think "Who is it!?" and it then comes as a shock, almost like Georges Louis Borges. I like finding music and moments like that. Obscure and metaphysical.

JC: Will there ever be a Greasy Bear box set?

BM: [Laughs]. There's somebody trying to put the Phillips album out. A chap called Nigel Croft. I've seen a couple of emails. I've agreed it, C.P.'s agreed it. Steve's got some of the tracks. Phillips paid for that album but never put it out. But who'd want to buy it!?

Keir Stewart

It was my biology teacher James Tully who kindly informed me about the personel behind the first Morrissey solo album. "It's Vini Reilly playing guitars, apparently from a band called the DC" Jim said.

"Who's Vini Reilly?" I asked.

"A guitarist from this 'cute' (he sounded a bit sarcy) guitar and drum instrumental band who are on Factory Records, they're alright - saw them supporting ++++ at the Free Trade Hall, the're ok i suppose" Jim Shrugged, his reply was fairly unenthusiastic , but I was always impressed with any info he could splash me with about bands, & Manchester music was paticularly exciting because it was on my doorstep!

That weekend I heard Annie Nightingale play "What is it to me Woman" and "English Landscape..." from the album Guitar &... - . She made a big thing of it being the first release on DAT tape. This was clearly a Tony Wilson format push as he was always looking favorably at new tech. He was convinced DAT would become a consumer format. What i heard was strange & refreshing, a spacious washy twang of synth bass whammy bar guitar & with dusty brushed toms & cymbals... I was strangely intrigued by the collision of sounds that compared to my other listening diet, was highly technical yet completely lacking in any traditional structure - out of the box music if you like, without being jazz. Back at school on monday, i pestered one of my best friends Ben Raymond for a copy of this album as his Dad's mate was a compulsive vinyl junkie and provided a healthy (& illegal) supply of cassettes to me & Ben of pretty much ANY album we were after. Each tape was ALWAYS recorded perfectly from a Mitchell Girodec turntable and demagged Nakamitchi Cassette Deck, every song title neatly written in fine graphics pen on the inlay. I listened, and it was good. Later that year 1988 saw the release of the first Morrissey solo album, & it had the unmistakable signature sound of the DC enmeshed within, yet still compliant with "The Smiths" code of musical practice - it seemed so strange that Morrissey would co-operate with a musician (Vini) who was so progressive with the synths & tech, it was also intriguing that the whole production team was basically the same as the DC minus Bruce. I also knew that such detail & about how this record was made, would largely pass the general public by, i felt like I had some inside info.

My first professional encounter with DC was back in 1996. I'd been asked indirectly by an old schoolfriend Laurie Keith if i could help record some guitars & piano for DC. I had a connection at Cutting Rooms Studio in Cheetham Hill & managed to swindle a nice deal as long as we got the session closed in one sitting. Needless to say, the session wasn't smooth. It was really bad, I didn't know the studio too well & i'd only just started helping out at Pete Waterman's studio in Deansgate Church - i'd made a few records but was still a bit shaky on the controls. I couldn't get headphones working, the old Raindirk Console was playing up BUT we did get an amazing piano sound out of an old baby grand going through an Eventide Harmonizer. We got out at about 5 am with 3 versions of "Organ Donor" mixed. The next day Vin phoned me to thank me for the work i put in & asked if i'd go meet Tony Wilson in the office - which i did. Wilson greeted me with an expression that i can only describe as surprised familiarity, Vin said "This is who i want to produce the new album" (pointed at me). "Ok, fine" Tony replied

The song was Organ Donor and later came out on "Time Was Gigantic" album which i eventually recorded mixed & mastered.

Remastering the first 4 was something that was originally looking like i'd have to grip the audio from existing CDs until i thought that perhaps the actual 1/4" tape masters were still knocking about. Bruce was keen to help & managed to track them down at Manchester Museum archives. They were ALL on a big pallette & were tatty, old and covered in scribbled notes by Martin Hannett & Chris Nagle mostly. These were like ancient scriptures of the Factory, original and intact - we did the transfers at the Royal Northern College of music where we got hold of a lovingly maintained Studer machine. Banged the outputs into a new sizzling Prism converter. The recordings sounded as fresh as a daisy, though "Another Setting" needed some serious denoising.

People ask me to master stuff quite a lot, i don't really know why. It's so easy, and not very creative - but at least it's good to know that these early recordings have been "brought up" a bit & had the honor of having a really close look at some unique sonic remains.

Keir Stewart - Producer & Company Director



Stewart Pickering

JC: I've heard various stories about the recording of LC. What are your recollections?

SP: It was done at Graveyard Sounds studios which is a basement studio in Prestwich in Manchester. And I think at the time, from recollection, that we had a 4-track in that rehearsal room for our band. I played in a band called Pegasus. And it sort of evolved into a studio so I was recording various people as I found I had an additional talent to do it. As far as I can recollect, it was done on a Teac. I don't think I had moved on to 8-track by that time. It was played pretty live. I can't remember any significant overdubs, just the occasional overdub and the vocals. Were there any vocals on that album? I can't remember. But I remember Bruce's percussive style on the drums and I remember, unusually, liking the drums. A beach ball bouncing on a pond type sound. So, it was quite an unusual sound and it just seemed to gel. They relaxed pretty much in the studio and played everything pretty live. And it went down very quickly. I didn't know anything about Durutti Column before they came in. In my era, I'm a little bit older, my era was more the 60s and 70s, progressive stuff, psychedelic rock etc. I really enjoyed working with Vini. Very creative, good sound.

JC: How did working with Vini come about? Was it something that Factory organised or that the band organised?

SP: I didn't know Vini and I didn't know Bruce. I was doing various bits of work via Tony. Martin Hannett came into the studio The Graveyard and the Ballroom with A Certain Ratio. He was really experimenting with drum sounds on various things. The guys from Joy Division / New Order I think were buzzing around as well. I really met Factory pretty soon after Ian Curtis died. I didn't really know them before then. But I got to know Factory quite well and did quite a lot of recording for them. Donald Johnson and Bernard Sumner in particular because the two of them produced other bands. But with The Durutti Column I didn't know them at all before they came in and I ended up producing the album. It was very easy to do. If it's relaxed, it's very relaxed, let's put it that way.

JC: So was LC really your first encounter with them or were there other little things before.

SP: I think it was my first encounter with them. I also did some stuff for Sordide Sentimental and I also did some other tracks when I joined Revolution later on.

JC: Was it the Durutti Sordide? Or was it another Sordide?

SP: It was the Sordide with Durutti. The one with the very fancy sleeve.

JC: OK, well that was probably your first thing then because Bruce was saying how that was his first Durutti playing and then, a few weeks later, came LC.

SP: He's probably right. [Laughs] My recollection is a bit hazy.

JC: I think in those days things were happening very rapidfire.

SP: Yeah, they were working in various studios, Strawberry, Cargo, all over the place. Spending money very badly. [Laughs]

JC: How do you think LC sounds now?

SP: It's good. I listen to a lot of material that goes right back to the Sixties, made with very primitive recording techniques. The sound is appropriate to the music and the time. It hangs together and I don't know whether with myself, when I went to 24-track, whether I ever created quite such a good sounds as on the 4-track with certain bands. There was definitely a period when working with 24-track was more demanding than working 4-tracks because you had to make such quick decisions on 4-track. But I think it stands the test of time and Vini has always said he thought the album was great. Well, I don't know if he's ever said that to my face... [Laughs] but I presume he's telling the truth. And I'm happy with the album. I think it's great.



Vini Reilly

JC: When all the master tapes were found, did that come as a relief to you or did you suspect that Tony had them all?

VR: I wasn't sure because, you know as much as I do how disorganised Factory was. So I didn't know. But that last I'd heard about master tapes was that Alan Erasmus had master tapes. So I thought maybe Alan's lost them all or tidied them away somewhere and he can't find them so I was a bit surprised and delighted that they turned up. I didn't expect them to be found.

JC: The breadth and variety of things that were found there is going to amaze quite a few people I think. Not least just with The Durutti Column. I mean, having seen the photo of all the tapes on the palette, there's quite a range of stuff. Like fifty tapes of just The Durutti Column is the rough count of things.
VR: Wow!

JC: Then, beyond Durutti I think everyone is accounted for. But obviously for the purposes of this album, we're talking about the first four albums, as they've been called before now. And they've been re-released twice before. With this release the aim is to put everything back as it was when it came out on vinyl and to give it the treatment it deserves really. Obviously Keir has done the remastering.

VR: Well if Keir has remastered them then they will be good because is absolutely immaculate at all of that. He's quite astonishing. He's a very very talented guy. I'm looking forward to actually hearing them.

JC: Whilst we're talking remastering and redoing things, going back to The Return of The Durutti Column, that was initially released and then, a while later repressed with a different "mix" and came out in a different sleeve. Do you remember the background to how that all happened?

VR: First of all you have to realise that I didn't really believe it was going to be an album. It seemed too incredible to me. On the one hand there was a fully functioning band who would later call themselves The Mothmen. But they were The Durutti Column as was and I'd left them. I'd written a short note to the band and a short note to Tony saying I didn't want to do this any more because I was disillusioned with, well a few things really, the other musicians really. But Tony and Alan Erasmus kept coming round to see me. I was in a very bad way, physically and emotionally. I was just doing these guitar pieces, which I always do anyway, always have done, always will. So Tony just turned around and said "Well, you are The Durutti Column" and we'll release an album of these little guitar pieces. So it seemed so absurd to me, that post-punk environment that this would happen. I didn't think that anyone would buy them. I was also a little removed from reality because I was on very very strong medication. I didn't believe it to the extent that when the first recording date dawned Martin Hannett had to get my then girlfriend and her parents to get me out of bed because I was fast asleep! I didn't really think it was going to happen. Martin Hannett drove me down to the studio. So when it was initially released with the Sandpaper sleeve, at that stage I'd had very little involvement, certainly in packaging and the release dates and all the rest of it. I went into the studio with Martin and played about thirty pieces of music over a period of two days and then went back home and concentrated on being depressed and ill again. And then the next thing I knew Tony came round and put a white label of an album into my hand. So it did seem to me then to become concrete but I didn't know much about the Sandpaper sleeve until I actually wandered into the Factory office to find Joy Division sticking sandpaper cards on old steam locomotive sound effects album covers.

JC: So if you cared to inspect your copy you might find it was something else beforehand.

VR: Yeah, you should do. That's one thing I do remember of it. So to that extent I didn't really have any input into which tracks went on and I didn't even hear the final mix until I got the white label. I'd just left the studio and I didn't hear any of it again until it was all mixed properly. So I was very removed from that until Tony said "We've done enough Sandpaper sleeves now; we want to give it another sleeve". And Tony just asked me which artists I liked at the time and I really loved, and still do love, Raoul Dufy, the post-impressionist guy. I had a very old but very beautiful book which had been a gift of Dufy prints and I think Tony and I chose together three prints from that book. And then I heard no more. I didn't know what was going to happen and the next thing I saw these beautiful sleeve with those three prints on. So I was really over the moon when I saw the sleeve. I thought it was a great sleeve. I don't even know who did that sleeve. It wasn't Peter Saville was it?

JC: I can't remember off the top of my head but it doesn't look like a Saville sleeve [it was Stephen Horsfall]

VR: I don't think Peter did any of us at all. I think it was a policy by Tony that he did New Order sleeves and basically that was it. So I don't know who did that sleeve but it was very good. I really liked it. So that's the extent of my input.

JC: So, with regard to the changed sound on the repressing, under whose direction was that done?

VR: I actually don't know. I have no idea at all. I think because of my own strange attitude to my own music which is once it's done I lost interest. So I didn't get involved. Tony recognised this about me and realised he didn't have to involve me so he just went ahead.

JC: So, it wasn't that you'd heard the initial pressings and weren't happy with the sound quality?

VR: No, not at all. I mean the thing is that I didn't really hear the initial record on a proper hi-fi. I just heard cassettes of it and I had a couple of vinyl copies of it but I didn't have a record player at that time. So I never really heard it anyway! But by that time I'd kind of lost interest anyhow. I was very removed from any of that.
JC: Moving on to the second album, LC and by this time Bruce had come on board. Was that something natural that happened, that you asked him to join and he came and played with you or had you been planning to get him involved before?

VR: No, I'd seen Bruce around but I'd never really spoken to him properly. I was somewhat in awe of Bruce as a local character. He was very well known. I'd seen him play with the Albertos four years previously but I didn't know him. But what happened was the guy Jean-Pierre Turmel from Sordide Sentimental got in touch before I made LC and he commissioned a piece from me for his very sick and dying girlfriend Danny and her best friend the doctor who was treating her because she had leukaemia. And Danny and Jean-Pierre's record they listened to as lovers when they were chilling out was The Return of The Durutti Column so he commissioned me to do a piece of music for Danny which I believe she did hear before she died. So it was for that release, the 7-inch single that I spoke to Alan Erasmus, very unhappy about the drummers I worked with in the past because I knew they weren't right. I wanted to make this good in as much as I could. And Alan Erasmus immediately said "Well, what about Bruce Mitchell?" and I don't think I'd even considered that before because I didn't know Bruce. Alan immediately rang Bruce and said Vini Reilly's going to come round to see you. I didn't know this but Bruce literally lived around the corner from the Factory office. And that was the first time I'd actually properly spoken to Bruce and before I'd even actually asking him about whether he would play drums on these two tracks for this 7-inch single he just said to me in his usual style "It will be a honour and a pleasure". And that was it. The die was cast.

We were supposed to rehearse it. We'd booked a little hotel room that Bruce played in sometimes in Chorlton in Manchester, ostensibly to rehearse these two tracks but we ended up just playing through them once because Bruce just had them straight away. And I realised very quickly that he didn't need rehearsing and in fact it would be a mistake to rehearse it too much. So we went and recorded that 7-inch single. Then what happened was I'd bought, second hand off Bill Nelson of all people, a 4-track Teac reel-to-reel tape machine and over a period of five hours in a spare room at my mum's house I recorded most what you hear on LC. It's going through a Roland Space Echo on tape and it was full of hiss. Sonically it was a joke. I didn't even have a mixing desk. It was just done sort of flat. And that was the basis of LC. It wasn't meant to be an album. I didn't think "Well, I'll go and make an album now". I just had that five hours at night til about three o'clock in the morning and got very inspired doing all these pieces of music with a drum machine. We took the quarter-inch of that into Stewart Pickering's place and added Bruce's drums and also a piano and I think we added some of my vocals. The whole thing was done at Stewart's in one day and mixed in another half a day. So, it was five hours, plus one day plus half a day. Tony heard the roughs I'd done at home and immediately said "We should do something with this". He really liked it so it was Tony's initiative that made something happen as an album. Once more he seemed to have the vision to realise that it could actually become an album with the right attitude.

The sleeve for that was... what had happened was my first album The Return of... Bruce had unbeknownst to me been playing that album to his wife Jackie who is an artist and she found it very inspiring to paint to. So it seemed logical to ask Jackie to do the sleeve for LC, which she did, and several other sleeves too, as you probably know. So the sleeves then became Jackie's project and it was done very quickly and it's one of my favourite sleeves.

JC: Yes, it's a very good sleeve. After LC, came Another Setting and not much is really written down anywhere about Another Setting it's sort of a bit of another mystery really. Would you care to set the record straight for us?

VR: Well, that was Tony really indulging me with that album. By the time I'd done LC it was clear to Tony I presume that there was a career for The Durutti Column and that people were buying these albums. It was being played on the radio and stuff and I'd started doing gigs by then, playing the music with tape echo and a backing tape. And then also with Bruce. So I decided that I had this bunch of new songs where I was singing more and was a bit more dynamic I felt. So Tony said "Sure" and I ended up going into Strawberry Studios, which is a very prestigious, big studio as you know. Very expensive studio. I spent a few days in there with an engineer called Chris Nagle who used to work for Martin Hannett as his engineer. But unfortunately the combination of myself and Chris Nagle was not a good one and it really killed the album. None of the reverbs were correct and it didn't sing. The guitar didn't sound good. Nothing sounded good. The entire album sounded very very flat and I was incredibly disappointed with it. It had songs like "The Beggar" which we still play live and which is a very up, strong kind of rock song in a way. Well, the closest I get to doing rock anyway. But on the album it came out sounding really wet, just boring and flat. So I was very very disappointed with that album. Tony was also. I think we all were. I don't want to apportion blame, I'm sure I was as much to blame as Chris Nagle but it was just a very bad combination. I mean we had all the equipment you could possibly want and yet it sounded terrible. So that was quite a bad experience really. I think we all wanted to forget about that album as quickly as possible.
JC: According to Bruce you cut a deal with Tony over the next album, Without Mercy. Basically "I'll do your Without Mercy if you let me go in again and record some of my stuff". Is that how it happened?

VR: Yeah, exactly. Tony had just come in for a conversation one day and said "Look, you keep making these albums that you want to make and I'm quite happy with you doing that but just give me this one album and do it my way. I want it to have a narrative which will be determined by a Keats poem "La Belle Dame Sans Merci" which Tony said was the poet's version of a pop song - boy meets girl, falls in love with girl, loses girl, blah blah blah. That was how Tony saw it anyway. It was a very very Tony way of looking at it. So that was how Without Mercy was done but I hated every second of it because my heart wasn't in it. I can orchestrate for strings and brass and all the rest of it if I'm interested enough to do it. But at that time I wasn't interested in doing that. I didn't like the guitar sound - to me that's the key to it - if you get a good guitar sound whether it's a live performance or recorded, then I'm away. I can start anywhere and make a tune. With that guitar sound, where the guitar isn't responding the way I want it to, nothing happens. And that's really what happened with Without Mercy. So, another album which was a very very big disappointment. I think to Tony as much as anybody else. It was just really appalling.

JC: But at least out of that period you came to play Tim Kellett and John Metcalfe and sort of launch a whole other phase almost.

VR: Exactly. Those guys were great. As you know, we've just used John Metcalfe and Tim Kellett on the new album that we just completed. I'll always want to work with them because they're superb and they're very nice guys. Just very very good. In retrospect it was a very good move but at the time it was not much fun.

JC: There was quite a major tour of that album. How did you enjoy all that?

VR: I must admit I enjoyed the tour because at least on stage I could get the guitar sound I wanted and having got that it put some life into the pieces of music. And also it made me arrange them slightly more than I had on the album. Because I was more interested that I had a good sound. One of the Japanese tours we played a lot of Without Mercy. We played it a lot and we had a very good time because there was a very good bunch of people. Very decent guys, just nice people and a lot of fun to work with. And very very excellent musicians so it ended up being a good move to do Without Mercy.

JC: And now of course Tim and John are coming back to play with you in the concerts for the Manchester International Festival.

VR: The musical chemistry that was there right at the start is still there. We don't need to rehearse lots of stuff. They know what I'm getting at quite quickly and they know what's going to work quite quickly which is important. If you have to sit down and score every note and work out the dynamic, all that sort of stuff, I just run out of patience with it. So it's nice to work with people who are very quick and intuitive.

JC: And with regard the piece you're doing at these concerts, what you can let us know about that?

VR: I'm at the stage where I'm starting to think "How am I going to perform it live?" because it's quite multi-layered and I'm going to have to use backing tapes to some extent but it's a question of how little I can get away with because I don't really like using them, for obvious reasons. It's not very live for me then. I'm just at the stage where I'm thinking about each track and trying to figure out how I'm going to do it live. There are a couple of tunes which we just will not be able to do live in the way they are on the album. One piece, for example, is on a quarter-sized guitar called a quatro, from South America. But there's no way on this earth of miking that up so it would be audible. So I can't do that unless I somehow convert it to some strange tuning on an electric guitar. So there are all kind of logistical and practical problems to overcome. But I've started to think about it a bit more. I don't want to rehearse it too much because I don't believe in rehearsing - you can rehearse the life out of a piece of music. If I know exactly what's going to happen next I'm not interested. I like the tightrope walk of doing the gig where you don't really know what's going to happen next or how the other musicans are going to react to what one is doing at the time. So it's a case of keeping it live.

JC: So we can almost expect it to be different on each of the nights then...

VR: I think so, yeah. There's lots of room for random elements. Which is another way of saying mistakes. [Laughs]. I don't mind mistakes, as long as they're musical. I'm not worried about it. I think it will be fine. It's going to be very difficult to do live but I want to try because this album is not for me, it's for Tony.

--

SOLD OUT

A 6-CD limited edition box set on Kooky Records entitled 'Four Factory Records'.

Includes a package of interviews with the key protagonists from the period including Vini Reilly, Bruce Mitchell, John Metcalfe, Keir Stewart and Tim Kellett.

Advance copies were sold at the Manchester International Festival shows 15-17 July 2009. It was then be available in all good record shops (actual and virtual) and direct from Kooky from August 2009. All sets include the two bonus discs.

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